Lightswitch to Outdoor light & GFCI. (Deck lighting)

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  #1  
Old 08-26-12, 02:23 PM
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Thumbs up Lightswitch to Outdoor light & GFCI. (Deck lighting)

Hey all!

I live in Ontario and I am near completion of a new deck I'm installing.

I am trying to wire outside lighting.
As of right now there is a lightswitch in my garage that turns on an exterior light fixture.


I would like to have the switch still feed the light but also feed a GFCI that is hooked up to my deck lighting.

Now I have 3 lights I would like to hook up to this GFCI... Is there such thing a a 4 port one. Or just 2's. Or maybe I could hook up an extension chord to the end of the GFCI to give more ports? Or would it be safe to split the wires on the lights and just connect them in series?

Looking for any ideas you all might have!


How is the best way to do this?
Pat.
 
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  #2  
Old 08-26-12, 02:55 PM
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It would likely be easier to run a new GFCI off the existing light to power your deck lights. You can wire a fourplex (two duplex receptacles in a two gang box) to get the number of receptacles needed. You can do this by using one GFCI and connect the 2nd duplex to the load terminals of the GFCI.

Leave the existing GFCI for other uses.
 
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Old 08-26-12, 02:57 PM
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Welcome to the forums!

I would like to have the switch still feed the light but also feed a GFCI that is hooked up to my deck lighting... Now I have 3 lights I would like to hook up to this GFCI... Is there such thing a a 4 port one. Or just 2's.
GFCI receptacles are typically duplex receptacles. A single GFCI receptacle can protect other receptacles downline.

Or maybe I could hook up an extension chord to the end of the GFCI to give more ports?
Extension cords are rated for temporary use.

Or would it be safe to split the wires on the lights and just connect them in series?
Not sure what you mean by this. AC circuits are wired in parallel. What is it you're trying to do?
 
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Old 08-26-12, 03:09 PM
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This for the quick replies!

@Nashkat1: I meant split the wires on the lights to run them in parallel I guess so there would be 1 or two plugs instead of 3.
get what I'm saying?

@Tolyn: is it as simple as connecting a new run of outdoor rated cable to the back of the switch to a new GFCI, or from the back of the light fixture to the GFCI?
 
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Old 08-26-12, 03:52 PM
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is it as simple as connecting a new run of outdoor rated cable to the back of the switch to a new GFC
A switch does not have a neutral you need for the receptacle running to it except in cases that don't apply here. Not sure what you mean by connect to the back but if you mean the holes in back they are less then reliable then the screws and not recommended for any connection though that is moot in this case. Unless you want the GFCI on a switch you need to find an always hot cable. A switch box may not contain the neutral you need for a receptacle.
 
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Old 08-26-12, 06:21 PM
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I meant split the wires on the lights to run them in parallel I guess so there would be 1 or two plugs instead of 3.
get what I'm saying?
I'm not sure. There should be no plug-in lights outdoors, except for temporary holiday displays. You can install a GFCI receptacle and wire directly off the LOAD terminals on it to power the lights. And you can wire as many lights as the circuit is capable of supplying, in parallel.

Is that close?
 
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Old 08-26-12, 07:50 PM
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@Tolyn: is it as simple as connecting a new run of outdoor rated cable to the back of the switch to a new GFCI, or from the back of the light fixture to the GFCI?
I would come off the light fixture if you are going to control them off the same switch. Outdoor rated cable is required of it is outdoors but it is required to be protected.
 
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