Single phase residential 220

Reply

  #1  
Old 08-26-12, 03:19 PM
ukrbyk's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: USA/ Pacific NW
Posts: 3,207
Single phase residential 220

OK, before I spend $$

This thing here:

Atlas SLP-7K Full Rise Scissor Lift 7,000 lbs Capacity

can be set up at residential house, right? Just needs electrician to come over and tinker proper power supply to it?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 08-26-12, 03:22 PM
Member
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: United States
Posts: 68
As long as it's single phase it would depend on how much amps it pulls and if your service can handle the extra load.
 
  #3  
Old 08-26-12, 03:29 PM
ukrbyk's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: USA/ Pacific NW
Posts: 3,207
OK, so I need to find out amperage? My electrician told me, that all residential is 300 plus V anyway, so I should be good there..

Ok, it's:

Motor/Electrical Requirement 220 Volt, Single [1] Phase
30 amp Breaker Recommended

And I know I have most of my breakers at 30 amps in the main board anyway.

Are we good then?
 
  #4  
Old 08-26-12, 03:32 PM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 14,349
Normal household voltages are 120/240, not 300.

Very few of your breakers should be 30 amps, clothes dryers and water heaters are the two most common things on a 30 amp 240 circuit.

You can probably run the lift.
 
  #5  
Old 08-26-12, 03:38 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 32,629
It uses less then 10 amps so you should be fine. For some reason the manufacturer say 220 volts but I'm sure it will work just fine on a residential 240 volt circuit. We can help you run the power if you want.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 08-26-12 at 03:54 PM.
  #6  
Old 08-26-12, 03:41 PM
ukrbyk's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: USA/ Pacific NW
Posts: 3,207
Ok, cool. Thank you.

Out of curiosity:

have 4 x 30
4 x 40
2 x 50

rest is 20s and few 10s. 1 x 15.
 
  #7  
Old 08-26-12, 03:47 PM
ukrbyk's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: USA/ Pacific NW
Posts: 3,207
Thanks, Ray. I have 2 very good electricians to choose from and am dumm electrically. Will cost me 50 bucks or so, not worth hassling with it.

220 is supposed to rise vehicle faster. Better than 110.
 
  #8  
Old 08-26-12, 03:55 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 32,629
You need a 15 amp 240 volt circuit for it. http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j...plIzMCRloTeypw

5.2 ELECTRIC MOTOR
Type ML90L2
Voltage 220V-1Ph
Power 2.2 KW
N Poles 2
Speed 2800 rpm
Motor enclosure type B14
Insulation class IP 54
Motor connection must be carried out referring to the attached wiring diagrams (Fig. 5).
The motor direction of rotation is shown in the label placed on the motor.
Before use of the lift, make sure to check if the motor specification shown in the nameplate of the
motor conforms to the local electric supply.
If there is over 10% fluctuation on the electrical power supply,it is suggested to use the voltage
stabilizer to protect the electrical components and system from failure working.
 
  #9  
Old 08-26-12, 05:37 PM
ukrbyk's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: USA/ Pacific NW
Posts: 3,207
Thank you. 111111111111111111111111111
 
  #10  
Old 08-26-12, 06:31 PM
Nashkat1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 8,470
220 is supposed to rise vehicle faster. Better than 110.
You don't have either 220V or 110V power. Your house has 120/240V power. 220V should be either the minimum or the mid-point of the power requirement for the lift, so it should work fine on a 15A 240V feed.

I have 2 very good electricians to choose from and am dumm electrically... My electrician told me, that all residential is 300 plus V anyway
I would go with the second electrician, unless you are misremembering or misquoting the one who told you this,
 
  #11  
Old 08-26-12, 07:46 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,356
My electrician told me, that all residential is 300 plus V anyway,
Are you sure he didn't say that, "All residential wiring is rated for 300 volts or higher" rather than what you wrote?

Is this lift by any chance made in China? I have been looking at (and buying some) electrical/electronic equipment made in China and in the description it always states either 110 or 220 volts.

BTW, the voltage applied to the hydraulic pump has no bearing on how fast the lift will rise. The speed will be exactly the same with either 120 or 240 connected properly to the motor.
 
  #12  
Old 08-26-12, 08:24 PM
ukrbyk's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: USA/ Pacific NW
Posts: 3,207
Don't remember; not sure; guy worked with me for several years by now, I have no problems. I spent some time researching lifts, everyone says 220 motor raises vehicle faster, as in - shorter time.
My main catch on this is that it basically folds flat. I am very limited on choices, it will fit well into what we have now.
Found a lot of feedback on this particular model, no one appears to have any issues with them. I have electrical equipment running for years, daily at work and here in the house, made in PRC. No issues.
My heaviest vehicle is 4400lbs, this one has way much redundancy on lifting capacity.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'