Low voltage wall receptacle without a box

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  #1  
Old 08-26-12, 11:03 PM
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Low voltage wall receptacle without a box

I'd like to drill a hole that barely fits a coaxial cable with connector and a CAT 3 cable, then attach a wall plate directly to a lath and plaster wall without a low voltage box. I could understand that maybe the connector shouldn't touch the metal lath in the wall (though I never actually read that you should prevent connectors from touching metal objects) but assuming it won't touch, would I be violating the electrical code if I don't use a low voltage box?

I read about low voltage boxes that are "UL approved and meet NEC requirements" and I got a free read-only look at NFPA 70, but there's no search feature and it's hard to figure out whether I'm required to install a box or whether the code just has specs on such boxes without requiring their use with coaxial receptacles.
 
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Old 08-27-12, 05:04 AM
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The coax does not need a box. You can install a LV ring instead of screwing into the plaster. Some plaster is not very secure on the lath or strong. Look at something like the Arlington LV1.
 
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Old 08-27-12, 07:39 AM
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Those rings/brackets are what I was calling a low voltage box. I'm not sure the wall is hollow. If there's a cinderblock column there, I don't want to make a hole larger than 5/16" (I'd attach the coaxial connector once the cable is through the wall). Even if it's hollow, I wanted to avoid drilling a hole large enough for the mounting wings, but I'll attach a wall-mount box if I have to.
 
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Old 08-27-12, 08:30 AM
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If you don't want to use a LV ring, ensure that both screw holes are centered in laths and pre-drill your holes to prevent splitting the lath. There usually isn't metal in a plaster/lath wall. If you have metal, you have mud wall, which is thickset mud (concrete) spread over metal mesh that has been fastened to the studs. If that's the case you will need to use plastic expansion anchors for the screws.
 
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Old 08-27-12, 10:53 AM
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Yes, I guess it's called a mud wall. Wikipedia says "there were various types of diamond mesh metal lath" so I guess it's that too. I'll just use the screws and anchors. I don't want to bring down a 16 story building from an attempt to install an LV ring in a concrete support.
 
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Old 08-27-12, 12:25 PM
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Oh ok.. To me, lath is the wooden strips that you spread plaster over. I don't associate it with metal.

 
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Old 08-27-12, 01:00 PM
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The wooden laths pre-date the expanded metal lath.
 
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