Go Back  DoItYourself.com Community Forums > Electrical, AC & DC. Electronic Equipment and Computers > Electrical - AC & DC
Reload this Page >

4 Way Swtich using GFCI outlet load connectors for light. Recommneded/required?

4 Way Swtich using GFCI outlet load connectors for light. Recommneded/required?

Reply

  #1  
Old 09-05-12, 12:19 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 10
4 Way Swtich using GFCI outlet load connectors for light. Recommneded/required?

Just wanted to get a confirmation/consensus that the following scheme is not going to have any issues and if this is the prefered method for outdoor lighting and power outlets.

Question: Is using the "load" connectors on the GFCI outlet required/recommended for supplying power to outdoor lights (via 4 way switching scheme as noted below) for outdoor applications?

Name:  Wire_Color_Run_with_GFCI_outlet.jpg
Views: 43223
Size:  27.1 KB

NOTE: Ground wires not shown but will be used in actual installation.

Thanks,
Moe
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 09-05-12, 12:48 PM
Nashkat1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 8,470
Yes, that's the way to do it with both power and load in the same box. Note that, beginning with the 2011 NEC, a neutral is required in every switch box. This might not be in effect where you are yet, but you might consider running a 4-conductor cable to the 4-way and the remote 3-way, in order to provide a neutral in those boxes.

The GFCI protection for the lighting is recommended but not required, AFAIK.
 

Last edited by Nashkat1; 09-05-12 at 03:01 PM.
  #3  
Old 09-05-12, 01:40 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 10
Hi Nashkat1,

Thanks for your input. Regarding the common (white) wire; the actual panel supply lines (common and hot wire) are comming from the 4-way box to the patio 3-way and I do have a white wire (not connected) running from the 4-way to the upstairs three-way. I didn't capture this in the image as it would be confusing to follow and illustrate. However, I didn't realize the common wire to each box was per a code. VERY glad you mentioned that as I was going to remove the non-connected common wire that was running to the upstairs.

Also, the GFCI outlet and 3-way swtich are both located at the patio and will be in the same dual (double-wide) connection box. Seems you were keen on ensuring this was the case. I take it that this is per code requirements also? In any case, I should be fine.

Thanks again,
Moe
 
  #4  
Old 09-05-12, 04:10 PM
Nashkat1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 8,470
Moe, for clarification,
Regarding the common (white) wire;
there is no "common" wire in an AC electrical system. The two current-carrying conductors are the ungrounded conductor, commonly referred referred to as the hot wire, and the grounded conductor, commonly referred to as the neutral wire. Hot wires may be any color except gray, green or white (unless redesignated), but are usually red or black in residential 120/240V systems. Neutral wires should always be white in a 120/240V system. If a white wire that is included in a cable is needed as an ungrounded conductor, it may be used for that, and permanently marked at each end with red or black electrical tape or permanent marker to show that it has been redesignated to the different function.

OK. End of lecture.

Now, I'm not sure I'm clear, but it sounds like you're saying that the panel feed enters the box where the 4-way will be and then travels to a 2-gang box where the GFCI receptacle and the patio 3-way will be. At that point, the panel feed makes its initial connection to this system, to the LINE terminals of a GFCI receptacle. If so, then you have
Originally Posted by Nashkat1
both power and load in the same box,
if only because you ran the power feed to the box where the load is connected from the box it originally entered. That's fine.

Your system will work as drawn.

Since neutral is already in the downstairs box and the patio box, splicing the existing white wire to carry the neutral from the downstairs box to the upstairs box will definitely complete meeting that new core requirement. Just cap the white wire in the upstairs box before re-energizing the system.

To be clear, IDC whether the GFCI receptacle and any of the switches are in the same box. You could be using a GFCI breaker and a standard receptacle. It makes no difference in the function or safety of the system.

While adding GFCI protection for the lighting portion of this system may not be required, I would do it. It is outside, after all.
 

Last edited by Nashkat1; 09-05-12 at 06:24 PM.
  #5  
Old 09-05-12, 04:57 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 10
Hi Nashkat1,

Sorry about the confusion, but when I stated "common", I meant to state "neutral". The additional details within the lecture was most useful as it clears up a lot of confusion with coloring scheme and wire usage.

Regarding the panel and feed to the GFCI LINE, what you stated is correct. Here is the general layout that illustrates this and where you provided some good input: http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...-question.html

Thanks again,
Moe
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'