Adding Electrical outlet

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  #1  
Old 09-06-12, 01:44 PM
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Adding Electrical outlet

I added a wall mount hdtv to our master bedroom over the weekend and want to have a clean install.
I would like to add a receptacle outlet on the same wall.

The outlet that is presently on the wall is at the bottom and i would like to add a second outlet about 4 feet higher.

The outlet is presently using the backstabbing method or pushin * see image.

Can I add a floating receptacle behind the hdtv use 14 awg romex wire and hook onto the side screws of the existing receptacle that is lower on the wall?
I am pretty sure the master bedroom is a 15 amp or 20 amp service.


How would an electrician do it?
 
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Old 09-06-12, 01:51 PM
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Welcome to the forums

Looks like that's a mid-run receptacle in the circuit, as the two wires of each color would be juice coming in and then going out as well.

I would remove all four wires from the receptacle and add the new NM-B cable you propose putting the three blacks in a nut with a pigtail and the three whites in another nut with a pigtail and then run the pigtails into the current receptacle. It looks like there is a bare copper ground in there as well but it's hard to see - I would include that in a third wire nut.

What is a 'floating receptacle?'
 
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Old 09-06-12, 02:36 PM
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when i wrote (Floating) i was referring to the box being higher than 12 inches off the ground where they are typically installed.

you are correct it looks like the receptacle is one of many in a series or mid-run.


So instead of just adding to the receptacle and keeping the back stab you suggest twisting all of the wires and hook and loop it on the screws?
Any reason to go through the hassle of twisting #14 awg X 3 the stuff isn't very fun to twist.
 
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Old 09-06-12, 02:44 PM
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Back-wiring is ok, back-stabbing is not - from the looks of your picture, your receptacle is back-stabbed so I would go with the screws. You think 14 ga is tough? Try 12 - I hate putting that stuff on the screws.

You could buy better receptacles which would allow for back-wiring instead.
 
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Old 09-06-12, 02:49 PM
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I found this on another thread looks like back-stabbing a receptacle is allowed per ul listing. most people in the field do not recommend it.

What is back-wiring? vs back-stabbing?



Single and duplex receptacles rated 15 and 20 A that are provided with more than one set of terminals for the connection of line and neutral conductors have been investigated to feed branch-circuit conductors connected to other outlets on a multi-outlet branch circuit, as follows:

  • Back wire (screw actuated clamp type) terminations with multiple wire access holes used concurrently to terminate more than one conductor
  • Side wire (binding screw) terminals used concurrently with their respective push-in (screwless) terminations to terminate more than one conductor
 
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Old 09-06-12, 02:50 PM
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This forum strongly discourages the use of backstab because of the increased failure rate of the connection. Mitch's way is best.

Floating means not attached but that may not be what you mean. You need to install an old work box at the new location in the same stud bay as the existing box.and drop a cable to the existing box.

For ease of fishing the cable and because of the number of cables involved. Cut the nails holding the existing box and remove it. This will make cable fishing easy. Replace with an old work deep box. That will insure enough cubic inches.
 
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Old 09-06-12, 08:58 PM
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What is back-wiring? vs back-stabbing?
Back-wiring is inserting the stripped end of the wire into a
screw actuated clamp type termination with multiple wire access holes used to concurrently terminate more than one conductor.
Back-stabbing is pushing the stripped end of the wire into a
push-in (screwless) termination.
It's what you have now on the receptacle where you want to add the new cable.

Use the screws to terminate wires to any receptacle not made with back-wiring clamps, and tighten all four of the screws on every receptacle, whether you used them to terminate a wire or not.
 
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Old 09-07-12, 07:30 AM
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Yes, back-stabbing is allowed but that does not mean it's a good idea. I have no back-stabbed receptacles in my house, I put the wires on the screws in all of them. Not a quick job but worth the effort IMO. In your case, not much extra work and, as I said, you could spring for better receptacles which allow back-wiring; they're insignificant in cost compared to the TV.
 
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Old 09-07-12, 12:26 PM
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install went flawlessly thanks for all the advice. i ended up buying a few more receptacles. my biggest complaint is that the receptacle is not recessed into the wall so i might change that because the wall mount is very slim.
 
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Old 09-07-12, 12:30 PM
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Is the box flush with the wall and the receptacle just proud of that? Sorry, having some trouble trying to envision what you're describing.
 
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Old 09-07-12, 02:05 PM
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A picture would help us help you. You could use a clock receptacle for the TV. Image source: Home Depot
 
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Old 09-07-12, 03:03 PM
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Arlington has some nice products for behind a flat screen

Online Catalog | Specialty Boxes | Multiple Gang Recessed TV Box™ for Power and Low Voltage
 
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Old 10-05-12, 05:28 AM
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Backstab

Being an electrician I have had calls relating to no power at the receptacle outlet. Have seen many installs were the wires are pushed into the back of the outlet. What happen's is that through time with the heat that maybe generated at the outlet tends to losen that inter working of the spring catch and the wires will finally pop out.
 
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