No GFI in kitchen or bath

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  #1  
Old 09-12-12, 07:00 PM
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No GFI in kitchen or bath

My girlfriend's house has sold and had an inspection today. Inspector stated no GFI's in the wet areas. So my question - if there a rule of thumb of how many must be in the kitchen area? Or is it just best to check with the City's code requirement? Thanks
 
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Old 09-12-12, 07:05 PM
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Depends on when the house was built. I believe 1993 was the first cycle where GFCI's were mandatory in baths and kitchens. There must be 2 separate 20 amp circuits for the small appliances or countertop receptacles, and they must be protected by a GFCI. It can be accomplished by protecting the first receptacle in the run and connecting the downstream receptacles to the LOAD side of the GFCI. Bathrooms, likewise must be on their own 20 amp circuit and must be protected by GFCI.
NOW, with all that said, the inspector cannot require the house to be brought up to code beyond the date the house was built. If she wants to sell the house and that is the only contingency, it is a small price to pay to get it sold, and worth having it done.
 
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Old 09-12-12, 07:16 PM
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Hi chandler - thanks for that information. The buyer asked what would the FHA loan co. require.
 
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Old 09-12-12, 07:30 PM
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That's where it gets deep. Although they can't require upgrading code issues, they can probably set in place certain requirements in order to get a loan.
 
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Old 09-12-12, 07:46 PM
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Hmm... I see. Okay, that does make a different. I wanted to be prepared ahead of time, yet it sounds like I'd be spinning my wheels. Thanks again chandler, I appreciate all your help.
 
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Old 09-13-12, 05:31 AM
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Typically you would be looking at one GFI per circuit. Kitchens normally have 2 and the bathrooms can share 1 if they are on the same circuit.

The HI cannot require any changes to be made as they have no enforcement powers. I do not know what the loan company can do.
 
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Old 09-13-12, 05:54 AM
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The bank can set whatever requirements they want, unfortunately. Their money, they get to set the terms on when they will give it to you. Our bank did not want to see the HI report, or anything other than an appraisal that met standard FHA requirements. As long as the home met code when it was constructed and there are no major issues (peeling paint, crappy roof, etc), it'll pass an FHA appraisal. All the FHA requirements are online.

Insurance could be a different issue to, but again, I didn't have any problems there either. I've heard some insurance companies will only insure homes with problems X, Y, Z brought up to code or minimum 150+ amp service, no alum wire, and other things as such. Shop around if that's the case.

In either case, it shouldn't be difficult to add GFCIs where they are needed. I added one to my kitchen next to the sink where it was a standard recep. Not costly or difficult and gives peace of mind.
 
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