Run a new wire from existing outlet

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Old 09-17-12, 10:32 AM
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Run a new wire from existing outlet

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Hello,
I want to attached a romex line to create a new outlet.
I want to wire from an existing switched/unswitched outlet.
Do I connect the new black wire, white wire and ground to the un-switched connections? Need verification that this is the correct connection. Thanks, Ron
 
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Old 09-17-12, 10:40 AM
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You are going to need to pigtail the new black to the two other blacks. You will also need to pigtail the new ground as only one wire under a screw head is allowed. You could install the white in the back holes, but many prefer the side screws or pigtails.
 
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Old 09-17-12, 10:42 AM
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Welcome to the forums.

So you want the new receptacle to be always on? If so, then yes, you want to run off the unswitched connection. That said, it looks like this is a middle of the run receptacle so the best bet would be to pigtail the same colored wired together.
 
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Old 09-17-12, 11:10 AM
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thank you Mitch17 and PCBoss
 
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Old 09-17-12, 11:20 AM
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1 more question

I forgot to ask this in the original note. I have to flip the entire house circuit braker to disable the outlet. turning off 1 individual braker does not work. So, I assume that power goes to this box from 2 separate brakers. If that's the case, I'm curious why it's done that way.
 
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Old 09-17-12, 11:26 AM
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You have a switched plug and an unswitched one in this receptacle, they must be on different circuits. Not the way I would have done it but, then again, I removed the switching on the switched receptacle I had in my living room.

You should be able to find the 2 breakers which would completely shut off this receptacle.
 
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Old 09-17-12, 11:37 AM
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have to flip the entire house circuit braker to disable the outlet.
Just be very careful you don't mix the blacks from the two circuits or best case scenario of two problems you would create would be an accidental cross feed between the two breakers and worse case a 240 volt dead short.

Also be aware in you ever wake up to a dead receptacle some morning it may be because you receptacles are back stabbed. The first advice we give when members post that problem is to move any back stabs to the screws. Not saying the back stabs will give you a problem, just something to be aware of.
 
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Old 09-17-12, 01:37 PM
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I have to flip the entire house circuit braker to disable the outlet. turning off 1 individual braker does not work. So, I assume that power goes to this box from 2 separate brakers.
That's what it sounds like is happening. If so, you need to find and correct the source of that problem. Until you do, neither of those two circuits is protected.

The question is where this is happening. Your picture appears to show one 14-2 cable and one 14-3 cable. The red wire in the 14-3 cable is coming from the switch. One the cables should be carrying unswitched, ungrounded power from the panel on the black wire. The other should be carrying that power to an additional load.

If the switch for this receptacle is one of a set in a multi-gang box, that's a likely place to look for the cross-connection. If that's where the switch is, take a look there. If you can't spot it, another picture like the one you posted of the receptacle will let us have a look with you.
 
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Old 09-17-12, 06:42 PM
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I forgot to ask this in the original note. I have to flip the entire house circuit braker to disable the outlet. turning off 1 individual braker does not work. So, I assume that power goes to this box from 2 separate brakers. If that's the case, I'm curious why it's done that way.
If you mean that two separate breakers both supply power to both switched and unswitched sides, I would have to agree with Nash that you have a cross connection. That being said, if one of those two circuit breakers supplies power to the switched side and a totally different breaker supplies power to the unswitched side, then the neutrals for those two circuits must be kept separate and the tab broken between the two silver colored screws. Two circuits supplying power to the same yoke requires a 2 pole breaker or handle tie on the two breakers. I notice two neutral wires together in the back stabs so I will at this point assume that having two circuits feeding this receptacle was not intended.
 
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