Vent Hood and outlet on same circuit?????

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  #1  
Old 10-01-12, 01:02 PM
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Vent Hood and outlet on same circuit?????

I tried replacing the electrical outlet next to my range and there were 6 wires connected to the outlet. 3 white and 3 black. I'm assuming my vent hood was wired to this circuit because the vent hood does not work since I have the outlet removed, and the are 3 pairs of wires and not 2. I don't remember how the old outlet was installed and tried connecting the new one, but neither top or bottom outlet work nor the vent hood. Any suggestions?
 
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Old 10-01-12, 01:37 PM
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How were the wires connected before?

First you need to determine which pair is your source pair with a meter, connect the meter to each pair with power off, then turn on and check meter.

Normally white is neutral and is attached to a grounding bus. Black is hot.

Many people do not follow correct conventions.

Once you figure out which set is hot, connect it only to the outlet and test the one outlet. IF it does not work replace it and try again.

After the first outlet works do the following.

Mark the feeder wires with colored electrical tape to differentiate from others.

Unplug anything plugged into other outlets on the same circuit, examine outlets and plugs for any carbonizing or burnt condition, this will indicate an arcing condition of faulty product plugged in.

Once this is done and the first outlet works, disconnect the outlet, connect the 3 sets together and add a pigtail to each and wirenot the 4 wires, and tape the wirenut after it is tight. Attache the pigtail black to darker screw and white to lighter screw, and ground from pigtail attached to box (if box is metal)

Power on circuit and test outlet before continuing.

If breaker trips, then any of the wires may be grounded, disconnect the wire nuts and due continuity tests to other destination points of wire.

There are more steps if you have to do continuity test, post question on how to and will answer.
 
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Old 10-01-12, 01:39 PM
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Welcome to the forums! When was the house built? It is possible someone added the vent hood, and it is possible the house was built that way. How deep is your receptacles box? I would pigtail all the blacks together with a b-cap and all the whites likewise, and attach them to the receptacle, black on the gold colored screw and whites on the silver screw.. One wire to one screw. Pigtail will take care of that.
The key will be how old the house is and how deep the receptacle box is.
 
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Old 10-01-12, 01:43 PM
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Welcome to the forums!

I tried replacing the electrical outlet next to my range and there were 6 wires connected to the outlet. 3 white and 3 black. I'm assuming my vent hood was wired to this circuit because the vent hood does not work since I have the outlet removed, and the are 3 pairs of wires and not 2. I don't remember how the old outlet was installed and tried connecting the new one, but neither top or bottom outlet work nor the vent hood.
Was the receptacle you replaced a GFCI receptacle, or was it protected by a GFCI receptacle upstream? Have you checked the other countertop receptacles to see if there's a tripped GFCI there somewhere?
 
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Old 10-01-12, 05:05 PM
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The house was built in 1983. No GFCI installed anywhere in Kitchen. By "pigtail" do you mean to cap all the white wires together with a separate white wire coming out of the cap??? I believe the box is big enough to do that.
 
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Old 10-01-12, 06:18 PM
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Yes, that is a pigtail but the receptacle needs to be changed to a GFCI. Most GFCIs will accept two wires under each terminal. Using a meter or test light determine which cable is hot. Connect one of the remaining cables to it. If the vent works label that cable vent. If not using the same method test the other cable.

Now connect the vent cable and the power cable to the LINE side of the GFCI and the remaining cable to the LOAD side.

Above does not comply with current codes. See post #7 and 8
 

Last edited by ray2047; 10-01-12 at 08:19 PM.
  #7  
Old 10-01-12, 07:52 PM
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The range hood should not be on the countertop appliance circuit.
 
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Old 10-01-12, 08:19 PM
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I agree with PCBoss. My reply was based on the wiring you have not best practice. You need to either run a new circuit for the vent or if you know you will never have a built in microwave and vent run to a nearby circuit that is lightly loaded and not used for restricted circuits such as kitchen or bath receptacles.
 
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