Anyone experienced with fixing AC Powered clocks?

Reply

  #1  
Old 10-02-12, 05:23 PM
CircuitBreaker's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Trumbull, CT, USA
Posts: 350
Anyone experienced with fixing AC Powered clocks?

I just got an older (1992) Budweiser Clydesdale clock & lighted sign. However the clock seems to no longer work. I think something is misaligned or even loose, I think the motor works as I can feel the heat from it, But I don't know if that is an indicator of a working motor or not. The clock is not in the best of shape as it came from a bar years ago
The clock is made by Lanshire
The back of the actual clock motor is marked
Lanshire
Made in USA
Type XL7
105-125V AC Only 60Cycles
I am hoping I can get this clock working again
I can set the clock fine with no binding of the shaft but the clock does not move after I set it
is there a way to determine if the actual clock motor is good or bad? and how would I go about getting this clock to work again?
Thanks

Here are some pictures of what I am dealing with





 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 10-02-12, 08:34 PM
Nashkat1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 8,470
How is the power cord from the wall connected to the wiring inside the clock? Nice looking piece, BTW.
 
  #3  
Old 10-03-12, 04:05 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,968
Synchronous motors tend to go bad after years. Do you hear the motor running at all when you plug it in? Have you had the motor removed to check the output gearing and meshing?
 
  #4  
Old 10-03-12, 07:42 AM
CircuitBreaker's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Trumbull, CT, USA
Posts: 350
The motor is silent when plugged in, I have not removed the motor to check the gears yet.
Nashkat1 the power cord is connected to a short pigtail that the longer power cord then will attach to. The power cord is non polarized
 
  #5  
Old 10-03-12, 12:06 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,399
That is a really cheap clock motor. Replacement is the preferred repair and can be done fairly inexpensively. Google for replacement clock motor.

I'll withhold my comments on the entire unit.
 
  #6  
Old 10-03-12, 12:58 PM
CircuitBreaker's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Trumbull, CT, USA
Posts: 350
OK so I took the motor apart and the problem seems to be that the old oil turned into glue of course then binding up the gears (The gears are still in great shape though and the motor turns when plugged in) I have found a Guide on how to reassemble the gear box.I need to know what type of oil should I use to lubricate the gears so they turn freely?
Furd what don't you like about the entire unit?
 
  #7  
Old 10-03-12, 01:24 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,399
Furd what don't you like about the entire unit?
Okay, you asked.

It is a really cheaply made (plastic) advertising gimmick. Whole thing probably cost $2.95 to make but probably sold for $20 or more. Plus, I don't understand why people like to have corporate advertising in their homes. Add to that my really low opinion of Budweiser beer which is made with RICE. And finally, when it comes to clocks I'm a purist and I want a real mechanical movement, preferably with both multiple chime and strike.

However, if YOU like it then more power to you.


Oh, on oiling the gears...a fish-based clock and/or instrument oil is best but good luck in finding it. Really, a new electric movement is the best thing you can do. If it didn't have the lights in the base I would suggest a battery-driven quartz movement as they are quite inexpensive yet work well. You can even get chiming quartz movements.
 
  #8  
Old 10-03-12, 07:16 PM
CasualJoe's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 9,383
If it didn't have the lights in the base I would suggest a battery-driven quartz movement as they are quite inexpensive yet work well. You can even get chiming quartz movements.
A battery-driven quartz movement might still be the best option and leave the lights in a switchable mode.
 
  #9  
Old 10-03-12, 08:50 PM
Justin Smith's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Cressona, Pa, USA
Posts: 2,546
A battery-driven quartz movement might still be the best option and leave the lights in a switchable mode.
I agree, too. Plus I wouldn't like having to reset the clock every time I unplug it.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes