220 step down to 110

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  #1  
Old 10-11-12, 08:56 AM
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220 step down to 110

I want to replace my existing electric cook top with a gas cook top, but need a 110-volt electrical source for the new cook top's igniters.

I would like to avoid re-wiring the 220-volt receptacle, so am wondering if there is a step down device available that will plug into the 220 receptacle and reduce the current from 220 volts to the standard 120 volt, 60 cycle household current?
 
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Old 10-11-12, 09:22 AM
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Assuming you have a ground, white, and black or red to the existing 240 volt receptacle it can easily be changed to 120 volts/20 amps at the breaker box. No need to change the wires. Even easier though and code compliant is to just use one of the counter top receptacles.
 
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Old 10-11-12, 09:23 AM
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You would need to mount a small transformer to do this. It will be easier to add from a 120 circuit.
 
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Old 10-11-12, 12:50 PM
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What does the 240V receptacle look like? Is it inside the cabinet under the cooktop? Pictures always help us see what others are looking at. See How To Include Pictures.

Tech note: Assuming you are in the US, you have a single-phase 240V system split into two legs from which 120V can be drawn. Not 110 nor 220.
 
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Old 10-12-12, 05:53 AM
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My bad on the bogus numbers...

I am in the US, and according to the Owner's Manuals, the existing electric cook top, a Kenmore Elite, is connected to a "...3-wire, 120/240V power supply; the neutral conductor is not required for the operation of the appliance." and the gas cook top I wish to install, a GE model, wants a "...properly grounded 3-hole outlet with a standard 120 volt, 60 cycle AC household current."

I can provide a picture of the existing receptacle later today, but regardless of what type of plug it uses, is there not something I can buy or build that will plug directly into it and give me a 120 volt outlet on the other end?
 
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Old 10-12-12, 05:58 AM
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Easier to just use an adjacent receptacle or convert the 240v receptacle to 120v. Or do you still need the 240v receptacle? Please tell us the color wires at the 240 receptacle.
 
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Old 10-12-12, 05:59 AM
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I can provide a picture of the existing receptacle later today, but regardless of what type of plug it uses, is there not something I can buy or build that will plug directly into it and give me a 120 volt outlet on the other end?
Nothing that isn't going to run you 500 bucks or more.
 
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Old 10-12-12, 06:05 AM
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While Jason's $500 might be high I can't imagine any pro telling you to use a transformer. Too many better ways of doing it. Those ways have already been mentioned. So answer the question about wire colors to the 240 volt receptacle.
 
  #9  
Old 10-14-12, 10:21 PM
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if you open the receptacle box,you should have a black,red,white,and and either a green or bare copper ground wire.replace the existing 240 receptacle with a good quality 20 amp rated 120 volt receptacle.Use either Black or Red,the White,and the ground.cut the exposed copper wire off the end of the unused Black or Red wire and cap it with a wire nut.If you feel that you have the skill to do it,you can open the breaker panel and disconnect the unused wire from the breaker.But don't do this if you are not comfortable doing panel work.

Mod Warning: The breaker must be changed to 20 amps if it is not already 20 amps. The current breaker is probably 30 amps or higher and will need to be changed.

Mod note: The ground will be bare not green if modern cable was used. Older cable there may not be a ground and this would not be a code compliant method in that case.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 10-15-12 at 06:33 AM.
  #10  
Old 10-17-12, 08:44 AM
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My house had a pool apparently at one point, and there was a 240V double pole breaker in the main panel that supplied a subpanel. The kicker is that there was no neutral, only hot-hot-ground to the subpanel. Two black 6AWG wires and one bare wire. I needed 120V service so I relabelled one of the black wires with white electrical tape wrapped around it at each end to serve as Neutral, and then moved that wire to the neutral bus bars in the main panel and the subpanel, and changed the breaker to an appropriate single-pole unit for the remaining Hot wire. Ground remained hooked up as it was at each end.

Mod WARNING. The above contains non code compliant information. A black wire #6 or smaller can not be labeled white.
 
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Old 10-20-12, 05:07 PM
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If you goto a hardware store u can find a converter. It looks like a oven plug but on the other end of it, it has a regular 120v plug where u can plug in your stove
 
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Old 10-20-12, 05:30 PM
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If you goto a hardware store u can find a converter.
But there are far better solutions. They have been discussed above.
 
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