Wiring long distance to shop??

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  #1  
Old 10-29-12, 07:23 AM
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Wiring long distance to shop??

Hi All, I need a little advise and answers to some questions... I am wanting to route (outdoor #6 copper wire) underground to a workshop, about 400 ft away from a dedicated power meter. I need 50amp service in the shop.
My two Q's are...
Will I still get good 50amp service with the distance and #6 wire gauge??
Will I be paying more on my power bill, due to voltage drop???

thanks capt
 
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  #2  
Old 10-29-12, 07:54 AM
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I believe ound my answer.. I can't be done...
 
  #3  
Old 10-29-12, 09:20 AM
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You would need at least #4 copper depending on anticipated loads. #3 or #2 would be better. I would suggest #2.
 
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Old 10-29-12, 11:37 AM
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thanks ray2047, for your input, I will definatly go with the #2 seeing my machines uasally eat 30-40amps for long periods... How about the power bill, does the distance and wire size eat up electricty???
 
  #5  
Old 10-29-12, 11:55 AM
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No.....distance has no effect on meter. You are paying for use based on watts used.....period.
 
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Old 11-01-12, 04:04 AM
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3 wir or 4 wire

I have been reading that the 3 wire is out dated for running into sub panel, tht it now requires a 4 wire system....

Does that mean I should run 4 wires from the main to sub?
Or 3 wires to sub and set up ground bar system at sub?


thanks again
 
  #7  
Old 11-01-12, 04:21 AM
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One extra tidbit, of important info, i left out.... The dedicated meter i am running off of... I am running it into my home from a existing unused meter i have in my field so i have an exclusive meter for my shop.... my home breaker box is acually in my shop that i am pulling power from the dedicated field meter the subpanel will also be in my shop.... if you have any questions, about this feel free.. i will explain further...
 
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Old 11-01-12, 07:52 AM
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Captmark asked:
I have been reading that the 3 wire is out dated for running into sub panel, tht it now requires a 4 wire system....
Code requires four wires. There must be a bonded ground bar* in the subpanel and an isolated neutral bar. There must be at least one 8' ground rod (some jurisdictions may require two ground rods).

*Ground bars are usually sold separately and must be bought and installed.
 
  #9  
Old 11-03-12, 01:23 PM
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Thanks

Ok. So I can run 3 wires from the main into the sub and I then run the ground wire out of the subpanel?? Thanks
 
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Old 11-03-12, 02:02 PM
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Ok. So I can run 3 wires from the main into the sub and I then run the ground wire out of the subpanel??
No, all subpanels must be supplied with an equipment ground bonded to the subpanel and a GEC. (grounding electrode conductor) in addition to an isolated neutral and two 'hots". Four wires total, no exceptions.

I think you are confusing the EGC with the GEC. You need both. The first to provide a low resistance fault path for electrical insulation failure and the second to provide limited atmospheric electrical grounding.
 
  #11  
Old 11-08-12, 02:05 PM
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Ray2047

Thanks for all the input.. I am gearing up to purchase the wire.. According to any (wire size distance calculator) the correct wire size I would need for a 400ft or 800ft circuit (round trip) is 2/0 wire, I am getting ready to purchase, #2 wire which is way cheaper according to your advise. #2 is what I need not 2/0 correct??? Also what size ground wire should I run?
 
  #12  
Old 11-08-12, 02:28 PM
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what size ground wire should I run
#10 copper or #8 aluminum.
 
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Old 11-08-12, 05:41 PM
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Nobody has caught this yet? When upsizing conductors to avoid excessive voltage drop it is also necessary to upsize the equipment grounding conductor. In this case the equipment grounding conductor would need to be a #4 copper.
 
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Old 11-08-12, 05:53 PM
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Thanks for the correction, Furd.
 
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Old 11-08-12, 06:08 PM
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With ungrounded conductors sized to #2 copper, only a # 8 copper or #6 aluminum is required for a EGC. (250.66 & 205.122(B))
 
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Old 11-08-12, 06:36 PM
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Ok

So I can use #2 copper hots and neutral and a #8 copper ground. Too run a straight 400ft one way to the subpanel?? Thanks again Ray and others
 
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Old 11-08-12, 07:22 PM
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Thanks, Tolyn. oj]ag-desojig]wrs
 
  #18  
Old 11-09-12, 07:59 AM
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400' of copper? Unless you've won the lottery recently, I'd look into running aluminum conductors. They will have to be up-sized, but likely a decent cost savings.

(I always get my wire sizing wrong for feeders, so I'll let the others answer what size aluminum wire/cable would be needed.)
 
  #19  
Old 11-09-12, 05:28 PM
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YUp. This is going to cost a couple big ones. I don't know any place to get aluminum.. I am glad to had the help figuring this out...
 
  #20  
Old 11-09-12, 05:51 PM
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An electrical supplier will carry the aluminum wire you need. Most will sell to the public at a slightly higher cost. Voltage drop will increase with aluminum wire so you will have to up size more, so that is something to keep in mind.
 
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