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Wiring a 10000w 240v Oullet Garage Heater to a thermostat and to breaker

Wiring a 10000w 240v Oullet Garage Heater to a thermostat and to breaker

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  #1  
Old 10-31-12, 12:51 PM
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Wiring a 10000w 240v Oullet Garage Heater to a thermostat and to breaker

I bought a 10,000 watt Oullet Garage heater from Northern Tools, there were two customer reviews on there that explained how to wire a regular thermostat to this particular unit. I could understand neither in detail. I guess what Im basically asking for is, a dummies version on how to exactly wire the heater to a thermostat, and then to the breaker.

I plan on using a 50 amp breaker, since the unit draws about 41-42 amps, and 6 gauge wire.

If I need a 24 VAC relay, exactly WHICH one?

If I need a 24 VAC transformer, exactly WHICH one?

How do I wire these together (if needed) to meet my goal?


I understand that getting a professional electrician is the best bet, but I plunked 1500 on an electrician who wont even answer my calls for a downed wire that he installed, so Im going through hard times and I'd appreciate it if someone could look out for me and explain, step by step, how to do this. Im not a moron, at least, I dont think I am .

Thanks
 
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  #2  
Old 10-31-12, 01:12 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

Not sure the 50 amp breaker will suffice, breakers are designed to handle 80% of their rated capacity and you're over that.

Hang tight, we have pros here who will be able to set you straight.
 
  #3  
Old 10-31-12, 02:05 PM
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You could use a line voltage thermostat and then no transformer needed. Bring power to the thermostat first then to the heater. A low voltage thermostat would be more convenient if you wanted to place the thermostat in a place remote from where the wiring enters.

Is this an attached or detached garage? What size main breaker do you have?
 
  #4  
Old 10-31-12, 06:45 PM
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A 10 KW heater requires a 60 amp breaker and probably has a built-in control power transformer for a thermostat.
 
  #5  
Old 10-31-12, 07:48 PM
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I agree with Joe. Fixed space heaters are required to have branch circuits designed to 125% of the full load. That would normally include any line-voltage thermostat and I think that finding a thermostat rated to 52 amperes would be an exercise in futility.

I strongly urge you to study the installation manual BEFORE purchasing anything.
 
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Old 10-31-12, 08:40 PM
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The product discription says contactor included.
For commercial halls, warehouses, stairwells and factories
Durable stainless steel tubular heating elements
Thermally protected motor, mounted in cold compartment
Enclosed, factory-lubricated ball bearing motor
Factory-installed contactor
Ceiling mount allows 360 rotation
1 phase
8ft. max. recommended height
Almond
Source: Ouellet 10,000 Watt Commercial Fan-Forced Heater, Model# OASU10000T | Electric Garage Industrial Heaters| Northern Tool + Equipment It also says a thermostat is available at extra cost.
 
  #7  
Old 11-01-12, 01:05 PM
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Ok, thanks for the quick responses guys!

Ok, so you guys are saying that ANY line voltage thermostat rated for 220/240v will work to control this heater that has an output of 42 amps?

Basically, I realized that I am a moron, lol and I need to know does the amperage on a line voltage thermostat matter (The one on northerntools says it can handle 22 amps full load)

The installation manual is non existent, no lie. It only came with a sheet with one section dedicated to english explaining the kilowatts and how to install it vertically or horizontally (no wiring manual)

My garage is detached with a 100 amp panel.
 
  #8  
Old 11-01-12, 06:19 PM
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Ok, so you guys are saying that ANY line voltage thermostat rated for 220/240v will work to control this heater that has an output of 42 amps?
Not just any line voltage thermostat will work. The thermostat voltage rating should match the coil voltage rating on the contactor.

(The one on northerntools says it can handle 22 amps full load)
Is this the thermostat recommended for the 10 KW heater or did you just find a line voltage thermostat in their catalog? It's entirely possible you may need a low voltage thermostat. What is the coil voltage rating on the contactor.
 
  #9  
Old 11-01-12, 06:57 PM
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From the Oullet catalog:

Control - All models have a factory-installed contactor.
- 208V/240V control circuit standard
(with transformer if necessary).
- Also available with 24V relay, with or without transformer.
- Optional built-in thermostat.
- 120V control circuit available.
I shouldn't, but I'm going to guess that this is a standard model of their heater. That means that it has a 240 volt contactor and for that you need a 240 volt thermostat. Any electric heat line voltage thermostat rated for 240 volts will be fine but it MUST be wired with cable suitable for 300 volt operation. That means if type NM is otherwise acceptable for the building construction and your LOCAL code it may be used for the thermostat. If conduit is required then use type THHN/THWN conductors. In either case a minimum of #14 copper conductors is necessary to be code compliant.

I also noticed that the Northern catalog page lists the thermostat as being included with the heater.
 

Last edited by Furd; 11-01-12 at 07:02 PM. Reason: Added Info.
  #10  
Old 11-01-12, 08:15 PM
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Furd, there are two listings for the heater. One is about $200 more And IIRC three phase. The one I listed doesn't seem to include the thermostat, just the contactor and is single phase.
 
  #11  
Old 11-01-12, 09:36 PM
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I plan on using a 50 amp breaker, since the unit draws about 41-42 amps, and 6 gauge wire.
Your heater draws 10,000W / 240V= 41.67A, Since it will be on for more than 3 hours at a time, it is a continuous load, and the circuit supplying it must be sized at no less than 125% of the load.

41.67A X 1.25 = 52.08A. You need a 60A circuit protected by a 60A 2-pole breaker. The wire, assuming THHN in conduit, can be 8AWG if it is rated for 90[SUP]o[/SUP]C. If it is rated for 75[SUP]o[/SUP]C, it needs to be 6AWG.
 
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Old 11-01-12, 10:32 PM
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The wire, assuming THHN in conduit, can be 8AWG if it is rated for 90oC.
Sorry, but no. The 90 degree C. column is ONLY used for derating purposes. If the circuit was used with the 90 degree C. ratings then the terminations would also need to be rated at 90 degrees C. To my knowledge there are no terminals on either equipment or circuit breakers with such a rating.


Ray, I'm pretty sure that these heaters can be wired for either single or three-phase operation. I have a bit of experience with another brand that seems to be similar with this brand. Read all the pdfs listed on the catalog page linked.
 
  #13  
Old 11-02-12, 09:02 AM
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The 90 degree C. column is ONLY used for derating purposes. If the circuit was used with the 90 degree C. ratings then the terminations would also need to be rated at 90 degrees C.
Interesting. I may stand enlightened. Do you have a reference for that?
 
  #14  
Old 11-02-12, 10:39 AM
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I was afraid you were going to ask for a reference.

Sorry, but no I cannot cite the code paragraph(s) but I know it IS in the code. I've been retired for about 7-1/2 years and the last two years I worked I had no dealings with electrical systems. That puts me almost ten years behind the eight-ball. Maybe one of the other electricians (or maybe Justin) can give you a code citation.
 
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