Type of power to a well pump

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  #1  
Old 11-06-12, 07:38 PM
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Type of power to a well pump

I have an unknown submersible well pump that has a black and a red wire with no ground that are labelled E39388 type tw connected to a type SK-2 model STA-RITE 2-pole 115 volt 1.5hp 20A and 230 volt 2.0hp 12A - that is then connected with type NM 12 - 2 ground run up to a circuit box that has two 20 amp fuses in it - one is white wire connected and the other is black wire connected, then the bare ground wire is connected to a screw. This fuse box is then connected by another type NM 12 - 2 with ground running to the main fuse box with a double breaker. I am trying to figure out if the power source is AC or DC.
 
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Old 11-06-12, 08:03 PM
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I am trying to figure out if the power source is AC or DC.

Really?????? .
 
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Old 11-06-12, 08:55 PM
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Edison lost. Westinghouse won. War of Currents - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia If you actually have to ask you need to learn about basic residential power supplies in the US. One good book is Wiring Simplified available at many home centers, Amazon.com, and other book retailers.

Sorry not trying to give you a hard time. It is of course AC. It could be either 120 volts or 240 volts. If it is on a 2 pole breaker it is 240 volts.

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Typical 2-pole breaker. Notice the handle tie.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 11-06-12 at 09:31 PM. Reason: Remove mistake.
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Old 11-07-12, 02:35 PM
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I am trying to figure out if the power source is AC or DC.
Why ?
 
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Old 11-07-12, 04:47 PM
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I am trying to hook up a male female connection between the fuse boxe and main breaker so that when the power goes out I can shut off the fuses in both and then hook up an extension cord to my generator and then I will turn on the power to the fuse box only and be able to run my well pump.
 
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Old 11-07-12, 05:19 PM
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You would want to use a one appliance transfer switch. not sure if my link is the right one, but posted for reference.

Forget the extension cord idea. Wait for the electricians feedback.

Gentran Corporation: Generator Transfer switches for home & business
 
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Old 11-07-12, 05:39 PM
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The plug topic was discussed in another thread. So far none of the electricians here have labeled it non-compliant. I installed a plug (male) on the power side of my pump switch and a socket (female) on the SEP side. In order to connect my generator I have to unplug the cable leading back to the SEP. That isolates the generator from the service.

Assuming you get your power from the power company the only time you might see DC power is from a battery for an emergency backup for a sump pump.

It sounds like you have a 240VAC pump but you need to know that for certain before you mess around with it. If you don't have any electrical experience you might be better off getting an electrician to look at it. Not knowing the type of power that your home uses indicates that you have little electrical knowledge. Somebody earlier in the thread suggested Wiring Simplified. That's a book that every homeowner should have. You can get it pretty cheap on Amazon.com.
ONe thing to keep in mind is that if you eff it up you can kill somebody.
 
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Old 11-07-12, 09:50 PM
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To use the transfer box and the 240 volt connection on the generator, I would need to plug into the generator with a 4 prong male connector. how do I wire the transfer box to the existing wiring of the fuse box if I only have 3 wires (black, white, & ground) - what happens to the 4th wire that is coming from the generator?
Also would the transfer box replace the fuse box? Same wiring problem would still exist.
 
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Old 11-07-12, 10:03 PM
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Actually 240 volts only requires two wires and a ground. You probably need to look for a generator that has a 240 volt only receptacle. A four wire receptacle is 120/240. If you already have a generator with only a 120/240 (4-wire) receptacle you can make an adapter. The neutral is not used on a 240v adapter.

Please note while it is legal to use a two conductor cable such as you have the white should be treated as a red or black wire assuming you have a 240 volt feed. It is not a neutral.
 
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Old 11-08-12, 05:46 AM
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All these recent generator threads scare the heck out of me. So many people trying to do something they know nothing (or little) about. For every one of them who at least come to a forum like this for assistance, I'd bet there are a dozen who just charge ahead and endanger themselves or someone else.
 
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Old 11-08-12, 11:24 AM
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Just to add to what Ray posted - if you use a white wire (typically a neutral) as a hot wire you must identify the wire as hot. You can do that by painting the end of the white wire black (a Sharpie works well). I have seen electrical tape used also but I don't know if that is acceptable.
 
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Old 11-09-12, 02:30 AM
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So to clarify, i would use 120/240 volt plug on the generator and then i would use the 12-2 wire connecting to the 2 hots (black and red - black to black, paint the white wire black and connect to the red inside the transfer box) and the ground (green or bare) leaving the neutral (white) alone with no connection. I believe I would still need to use the fuse box and mount I the transfer box between the fuse box and the main breaker. And of course before doing any work make sure I shut off the power coming from the main breaker.
 
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Old 11-09-12, 05:34 AM
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There must be an interlock to prevent the power from the generator being turned on before the main breaker is off. If you truly have a fuse panel there is no way to interlock the fuses.
 
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Old 11-09-12, 05:45 AM
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Yes, that about sums it up unless there are any 120 volt loads such as lights at the pump house you haven't mentioned.
 
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Old 11-09-12, 05:49 AM
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If you truly have a fuse panel there is no way to interlock the fuses.
PC Boss if I understand correctly what he is calling a fuse box is a fused disconnect at the pump. I think he is going to put a single circuit disconnect between the breaker box in the house and the fused disconnect at the pump house.
 
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Old 11-09-12, 09:20 AM
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Ray is correct and nothing else is being operated on this line
 
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Old 11-09-12, 05:38 PM
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Unless there something else I need to know, thanks for all the input. I now have a better understanding of what I'm trying to do
 
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Old 11-09-12, 05:41 PM
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That seems to be it. Let us know how it goes.
 
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Old 11-09-12, 05:57 PM
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I have an unknown submersible well pump that has a black and a red wire with no ground

No ground ?? .....should be red, black, green
 
  #20  
Old 11-09-12, 08:10 PM
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the red and black wires are the only wires coming out of the casing for the well pump. they are also the only 2 wires connected to the sta-rite. there is no green or ground wire visible.
 
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Old 11-09-12, 08:26 PM
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Shouldn't affect the operation of the pump but not having a ground connected is strange. Maybe the water line coming up is galvanized and they assumed that was a good ground.
 
  #22  
Old 11-09-12, 08:41 PM
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I don't know but I've never had a problem with the well working and I bought the home over 15 years ago and I had to have it inspected for my VA loan
 
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Old 11-09-12, 08:46 PM
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It wouldn't cause any problems since it's not there. A ground is a protective thing in case something shorts out.
 
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Old 11-10-12, 06:33 AM
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the red and black wires are the only wires coming out of the casing for the well pump. they are also the only 2 wires connected to the sta-rite. there is no green or ground wire visible.
30 plus years ago just having two wires to the deep well pump was common. You might just have a very old pump.

I have an unknown submersible well pump that has a black and a red wire with no ground that are labelled E39388 type tw
The type TW might be your key here. I haven't seen any new type TW wire in at least 30 years.
 
  #25  
Old 11-21-12, 03:40 PM
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thanks for the help I've just gotta wait to get the money to buy the parts I need
 
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