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Reliance CSR202 Transfer Switch with Honda EG3500x Generator

Reliance CSR202 Transfer Switch with Honda EG3500x Generator

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  #1  
Old 11-10-12, 11:30 AM
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Reliance CSR202 Transfer Switch with Honda EG3500x Generator

I have some questions regarding this hookup.

The two circuits I want to use this transfer switch for is my furnace circuit (natural gas fired boiler, 4 zone) and my refrigerator circuit, just to keep the basics going during a power outage.

The transfer switch has an L14-20 input, and my generator has a few different output options, L5-30, L5-20, and L14-20. The generator has two operation modes "120V Only", or "120V/240V" mode. The "120V Only" mode outputs 20-25A by combining the two power circuits, while the "120V/240V" mode outputs 12.5A on each power circuit. In the "120V Only" mode the L14-20 output only has 1/2 of the receptacle powered, as one of the hot leads doesn't get any power.

If I simply connect the L14-20 input to the L14-20 output from the generator and run the generator in 120V/240V mode, my concern is that during startup of the refrigerator, there won't be enough power and would either drag the generator down, or damage the refrigerator motor, since I would be only supplying 12.5A to each circuit, and the refrigerator might need more than that during startup. I was thinking that it would better to connect the L5-20 generator output to the L14-20 input on the transfer switch, and run the generator in "120V Only" mode, since the two circuits I would be running are 120V anyway, and then 20A would then be available to each circuit. However, I would then need to make up a power cord that goes from the L5-20 generator plug to the L14-20 transfer switch plug, and would then be connecting the two hot leads of the L14-20 together, essentially splitting the L5-20 output hot lead into two leads that would then go into the transfer switch.

Is there any functional and/or safety issues with this? Has anyone experienced this issue before. Any advice on this matter would be much appreciated.

Thanks,

John
 
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  #2  
Old 11-10-12, 11:39 AM
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Not an electrician but why not get an L5-30 transfer switch? Use the gen in 120v mode. As long as no 240 loads....

This way you use full power offered from your gen..

Gentran Corporation: Generator Transfer switches for home & business

The electricians will chime in shortly...
 
  #3  
Old 11-10-12, 11:54 AM
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I would then need to make up a power cord that goes from the L5-20 generator plug to the L14-20 transfer switch plug, and would then be connecting the two hot leads of the L14-20 together, essentially splitting the L5-20 output hot lead into two leads that would then go into the transfer switch.
That would be the simplest way to do it. I would suggest using an L5-20 plug on a piece of 10-3 type SOW cable to a Bell (type) cast box with an L14-20 receptacle. This way you don't have to screw up a perfectly good 240/120 interconnect cable and it is far easier to parallel the wires in a box than to try to do it in a plug or connector.
 
  #4  
Old 11-10-12, 12:39 PM
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to a Bell (type) cast box with an L14-20 receptacle.
Receptacle? Or inlet ?
 
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Old 11-10-12, 12:44 PM
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.....................................................................................................................................
 

Last edited by lawrosa; 11-10-12 at 01:10 PM.
  #6  
Old 11-10-12, 01:07 PM
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to a Bell (type) cast box with an L14-20 receptacle. Receptacle? Or inlet ?
I would think he means inlet....

For reference


 

Last edited by lawrosa; 11-10-12 at 01:40 PM.
  #7  
Old 11-10-12, 06:42 PM
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I meant precisely what I wrote. I'd show you a picture of the one I made up for my generator except I took it apart when I changed the L5-30 original to the generator to an L14-30.

Essentially what I previously described is a short length of 10-3 type S cable with an L5-20 plug that fits the generator. The other end of this short cable fits into a Bell box where the white wire connects to the N terminal (or is it W?) of an L14-20) receptacle. The green wire connects to both the box's equipment grounding terminal and to the L14-20 receptacle's G terminal. The black wire is then connected to two pigtails via a wire nut and these two pigtails connect to the X and Y terminals on the L-15-20 receptacle. Stuff it all back in the box, fasten the receptacle in place and then add a cover.

Plug this contraption into the generator's L5-20 receptacle and then plug a standard four-conductor interconnect cable (with L14-20 connections) into the receptacle and the INLET on the transfer panel. This will leave the transfer panel wired in a standard configuration and both the transfer panel and the interconnect cable will be usable with a 240/120 volt generator with an L14-20 outlet receptacle.
 
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Old 11-10-12, 08:05 PM
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Interesting. Was the bell box mounted on the generator?
 
  #9  
Old 11-10-12, 09:51 PM
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No, it was just as I described. Essentially an extension cord about 18 to 24 inches long with a three-wire plug and a four-wire receptacle. It was just so I could use my generator until such time as I replaced the receptacle on the generator itself. Once I changed that generator-mounted receptacle (and added a label that it was 120 volt only with X & Y paralleled) I dismantled the adapter cable.

This gives me a power inlet on my house that is 240/120 volt standard to my transfer switch and on to the auxiliary panelboard. The interconnect cable (generator to power inlet) is a 10-4 type SOOW with standard L14-30 plug and connector. I have the ability to use ANY 240/120 volt generator up to 7,200 watts OR my little 120 volt volt (only) 3,000 watt generator with no wiring changes whatsoever.
 
  #10  
Old 11-11-12, 12:00 AM
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Great idea Furd. Simple and effective.
 
  #11  
Old 11-11-12, 11:41 AM
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Essentially an extension cord about 18 to 24 inches long with a three-wire plug and a four-wire receptacle.
Kewl! An extension cord that is also an adapter! Very clever and very effective.
 
  #12  
Old 11-11-12, 02:21 PM
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Thanks for the suggestions everyone, great idea Furd!

John
 
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