Controlling outdoor outlet using timer from inside

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  #1  
Old 11-13-12, 09:16 AM
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Controlling outdoor outlet using timer from inside

Hello,
I need/want to install an outlet (GFCI) outside for Christmas Light. It is possible to do that with a timer controlling that outlet from inside? Any recommend on either mechanical or digital? I had mixed experience with either. I'll be running 15A so 12g (for future expand) wires and weatherproof enclosure will be needed. Sorry if repost but I searched.
Thanks

Edit
I may have to install the GFCI protection for the outlet inside too since I plan to install the outdoor outlet up high, which not ideally for me to break out the ladder to do a reset if the GFCI tripped.
 

Last edited by nguyen27; 11-13-12 at 09:22 AM. Reason: GFCI location
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  #2  
Old 11-13-12, 09:29 AM
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Your easiest and cheapest (and possibly best) option would be to simply go with an outdoor timer. This way you have the outlet for other uses when not using it for Christmas lights.
I've used mechanical times with no issues in temps as low as -40'C with no issues. It should be noted that I tend to use my Christmas light timer for my car block heater after Christmas is over with.
Some timers even have the option of a light sensor which will turn the lights on and off when it's dark out. Not sure if I would consider that option as there is no reason to have the lights on all night when no one will see it.
 
  #3  
Old 11-13-12, 09:49 AM
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I looked into that option (portable out door timer). An outdoor timer cord is too short so basically I will need another ext cord to reach up the xmas light that mount up high so I'm looking for option. I have never like the Light sensor timer, they don't work right most of the time. Day light around here (Boston area) can be very mess up.
Thanks,
 
  #4  
Old 11-13-12, 10:26 AM
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A built in circuit timer would require an extension cord as well.

The only place I could see a built in timer being better is for items like hardwired lights. My porch lights for example would be nice to have them turn on in the AM when we leave (~5:45AM) and at night when returning home.
 
  #5  
Old 11-13-12, 11:31 AM
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Install a regular receptacle with an in-use cover outside.
Run a 2- conductor cable to a two gang box in the house.
Run power to the two gang box in the house.
In the two gang box mount a dead face GFCI and connect your power to the line side.
Mount your timer on the other side of the two gang box and connect to the load side of the GFCI.
Connect your cable from the receptacle to the timer.
 
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Old 11-14-12, 05:37 AM
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Thank you, one last question. Why the dead face GFCI is before the (from power line) timer? If that trip won't the timer get mess up. (This may not be the case since timer may contain backup battery) but I still do have a question about that.
 
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Old 11-14-12, 05:58 AM
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I have done something similar to what you're asking using an Intermatic time switch. The outside outets/lights can be manually turned on/off inside with the override switch on the timer or let the timer run it's program. Like mentioned, I have a dead faced GFCI as the first device in the circuit since the timer switch is in a garage. The only reason I used the dead face GFCI instead of an outlet one is because it's what I had on hand.

 
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Old 11-14-12, 06:44 AM
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Thank you, one last question. Why the dead face GFCI is before the (from power line) timer?
If the timer has a separate power in for the timer portion then yes the timer can be hooked to the power in instead but some timers that fit in a single gang box have the a single lead for power in and power to the timer so they can't be separated. You can separate them if you use a timer such as Dane posted or a single gang size timer with separate leads.
 
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