air compressor hard wire setup.

Reply

  #1  
Old 11-28-12, 08:49 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: usa
Posts: 11
air compressor hard wire setup.

Hey guys,
I just bought a kolbot 60 gallon air compressor. Im working on getting my supplies to hard wire it. Just need to make sure I get the right items. I have a 50' 12/2 cable, Siemens 15amp double pole breaker. Now do I need a 15 amp 250v wall receptacle or a 20amp 250v? Also should I move up in breaker to a 20amp as well?
These are spec. On motor
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 11-28-12, 09:26 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 43,233
Welcome to the forums Jesse!

What I did on my air compressor was to hardwire it directly to the panel which is in the same room. I put mine on a 20 amp breaker as I've heard that a compressor is apt to kick a 15 amp breaker on start up. I wired mine somewhere around 18 yrs ago and it still works fine.

I'm not an electrician but they will be along later, probably with better advice for you
 

Last edited by marksr; 11-28-12 at 09:47 AM. Reason: fix typo
  #3  
Old 11-28-12, 09:45 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: usa
Posts: 11
Thanks
Ive been reading some threads and a lot of people run 20amp breakers. I just want to be on the safe side. My panel is on the opisit side of the house so that might be a long run to wire direct to panel. That why I want to plug it into the wall receptacle.
 
  #4  
Old 11-28-12, 01:09 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 3,131
What do the specs. In the manual call for? It should state min. Wire size, min, ampacity for the Breaker, as far as using a plug connection you will still need to run the wire back to the panel, is the panel in site of the compressor location? If not you maybe best to use the plug for safety should you want to work on the compressor.
 
  #5  
Old 11-28-12, 01:50 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: usa
Posts: 11
The manual calls for 220-240/20amp double pole breaker.. my panel is on the opposite side of the house. I have a plug in my garage alreaby but its rated at 15 amps. Should I change it out for a plug thats rated for 20 amps?
 
  #6  
Old 11-28-12, 02:29 PM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 14,361
The circuit in the garage is most likely 120 volts and you need 240 volts.

Run a 12-2 cable to the panel and install a 2 pole 20 amp breaker. The white will need to be re-identified as a hot. Use black or red tape or magic marker.
 
  #7  
Old 11-28-12, 03:03 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: usa
Posts: 11
The plug in the garage was for a 240v washer twist lock. That washer got replaced with 120v, thus leaveing the twist lock free. The face place on the twist lock say 120/240v
 
  #8  
Old 11-28-12, 03:11 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 32,667
The face place on the twist lock say 120/240v
So it probably has a neutral. The neutral will not be used. Is this an attached garage.

If you hard wire and the breaker box is not in line of sight you should install an un-fused disconnect. A 30a or 60 amp un-fused AC disconnect will work fine and will give you a place for connections to a whip for the compressor.
 
  #9  
Old 11-28-12, 03:47 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 3,131
Only if you make sure the wire at that recept.is wired with 12 and you follow pcboss's instructions
 
  #10  
Old 11-28-12, 04:01 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: usa
Posts: 11
Ray2047
The un-fused disconnect would that be placed before the wall receptacle? Or if I use the disconnect box would I have to wire it stright to the panel?
 
  #11  
Old 11-28-12, 04:08 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 32,667
No disconnect needed if you are going to plug it in. I thought you were going to hard wire it.
 
  #12  
Old 11-28-12, 06:08 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: usa
Posts: 11
Ok get it. So based on all this info would plugging it in loose any power. Should the receptacle also be rated for 20amps? Hence everything else is.
Sorry for all the questions I just want to do this the right way.
 
  #13  
Old 11-28-12, 06:33 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 32,667
No power loss. Yes it must be a 20 amp receptacle with matching plug. NEMA 6-20R or NEMA L6-20R
 
  #14  
Old 11-28-12, 06:56 PM
CasualJoe's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 9,221
FLA is 15.7 amps, you might have to use a 25 amp breaker for the motor to start.
 
  #15  
Old 11-29-12, 07:18 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 563
When I wired for my compressor, both at the old house and at the new one, I just put a NEMA 6-50 receptacle on the wall, wired to a 50A breaker, and I used a 6-50 plug on the end of the compressor power cable. I went that way so that if I ever buy a welder and want to use it over there, I can just unplug the compressor and plug in the welder. Additionally, ACE hardware sells convertible NEMA 6-30/6-50 plugs for the power cables cheap, so it didn't cost much to make the connection.

Mod Note: Best practice is to use a circuit corresponding to the size recommended by the manufacturer and plugs sized to the circuit protection. Breakers for air compressors can be slightly over size to allow for starting current. 50 amps would be unsafe for a compressor with a recommended 20 amp circuit. {Unless it has built in overload protection.}
 

Last edited by ray2047; 11-29-12 at 11:11 AM. Reason: Modify Mod note.
  #16  
Old 11-29-12, 10:34 AM
braether3's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: wisconsin
Posts: 415
Not necessarily if the motor has built in overload protection then a larger breaker can be used.
 
  #17  
Old 11-29-12, 10:48 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 563
My compressor motor does have built-in overload protection. Nice big orange button on the side of the motor and everything.
 
  #18  
Old 11-29-12, 11:06 AM
ray2047's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 32,667

Not necessarily if the motor has built in overload protection then a larger breaker can be used.
Good point Braether3.

My compressor motor does have built-in overload protection
Thanks T-W-X for the clarification.

My mod note has been modified because of the comments above.
 
  #19  
Old 11-29-12, 09:06 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: usa
Posts: 11
thanks guys great info. helped me out a lot. just wondering what you guys thought about using this type of cable>>>or do i need one that has an Aluminum casing? also stranded or solid cabe?
Thanks again for all the help.
 

Last edited by jesse913; 11-29-12 at 09:28 PM.
  #20  
Old 11-29-12, 09:55 PM
Nashkat1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 8,470
just wondering what you guys thought about using this type of cable>>> or do i need one that has an Aluminum casing? also stranded or solid cabe?
If you're making a cord with a plug on the end of it, you don't need cable. You need rubber-jacketed electrical cord with stranded 12AWG conductors in it.
 
  #21  
Old 12-01-12, 06:08 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: usa
Posts: 11
well i ran my wire from my compressor to my receptacal. but i noticed that the wire there is a 10/3. what should i do now?
 
  #22  
Old 12-01-12, 06:13 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 32,667
This is service cable (SO) with a cord cap (plug) correct? If so you use white and black for the hots and green for ground.
 
  #23  
Old 12-01-12, 06:46 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: usa
Posts: 11
i havent pulled the face plate yet. i take it apart il check it out and see how its set up.
 
  #24  
Old 12-01-12, 07:28 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 32,667

i havent pulled the face plate yet. i take it apart il check it out and see how its set up.
Face plate on what.

Your post has changed enough I'm not sure what you are doing. Can you please detail your present plans step by step.
 
  #25  
Old 12-01-12, 11:07 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: usa
Posts: 11
Ok im sorry for the confusion. Right now I ran wire from compressor to wall Receptacle. But while I was up in the attic I seen the wire that goes to the existing receptacle and thats a 10/3. So my question was how to wire the 10/3 to the receptacle thats receiving a 12/2 plug. I am not hard wiring it any more im plugging it in. Hope this clears up the confusion.
 
  #26  
Old 12-01-12, 11:26 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: NJ - USA
Posts: 43,494
Ok.....you're wiring from the compressor to the wall with 12-3 rubber cable (black,white,green)

You're using a 240 volt type of 3 pin plug and receptacle.

You have a 10/3 wire with ground coming to your receptacle. You will be using red and black for your hot wires and the bare or green for your ground. You will NOT be using the white wire. It can stay connected at the panel and be wire nutted off in receptacle box. It could also be wire nutted off in panel if you;d like.

At the panel you will be putting the red and black wires in to a two pole 20 amp circuit breaker.
 
  #27  
Old 12-02-12, 12:06 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: usa
Posts: 11
Thanks pjmax. Ill try it that way.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'