Did Someone say WAGOS......

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  #1  
Old 12-02-12, 01:34 PM
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Did Someone say WAGOS......

Am I opening up a can of worms....

Or are wagos akin to before wirenuts, there was tape and solder ;-)

I've used Wagos in tight high hats as well as populated switchboxes. It keeps for a tidy switchbox IMO.


I'm planning to install a transfer switch. Dare I use Wago's to tie the hots in the panel . Or are ya'll dirHard Nuts
 
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  #2  
Old 12-02-12, 01:46 PM
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WAGOS = push in connectors........ .. .....

Not in my panel......enough said.
 
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Old 12-02-12, 01:58 PM
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Ditto what PJ said. Underscore that.
 
  #4  
Old 12-02-12, 02:12 PM
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I'm talking about the lever ones ....

They are a godsend when working with 12AWG in wiremold outlet tracks which have nil to no room to splice 12/3 in the space they allow.
 
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Old 12-02-12, 02:34 PM
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They are a godsend when working with 12AWG in wiremold outlet tracks which have nil to no room to splice 12/3 in the space they allow.
I don't run 12-3 or any other cable in raceways, except for shielding. And I've only put splices in a raceway once, when the concrete-cutting guys cut into the feed for a subpanel in a grocery store we were remodeling. I also called the inspector for the job and got his verbal approval for the repair method before I started.

Splice in Wiremold? Why?
 
  #6  
Old 12-02-12, 03:03 PM
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Undercabinet Wiremold Outlets.
I have done this is both my primary and vacay.

It's tight in there......splices are to feed the line as well as connecting them when wrapping a corner. Need to offset the 3 wires/splices as it's just that TIGHT in there.
 
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Old 12-02-12, 03:09 PM
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I will use push in connectors for device boxes but not ceiling boxes or J-boxes. I will use nuts and twist the wires for a good connection.

On a job I was just on another electrical outfit came in and swapped out all the light fixtures for some kind of rebate program. They used all 3 hole push in connectors. Even if they had more then 3 wires they would push in two wires, then a pigtail to another 3 holer to add the other wire(s). I guess nobody told them that make 4 and 6 holers.
 
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Old 12-02-12, 03:17 PM
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I just run single conductors from one device to the next in Wiremold. No inaccessible splices means no inaccessible splices. The rule against splicing in enclosures not rated to contain splices works the same way, AFAIK.
 
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Old 12-02-12, 03:25 PM
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It's been awhile so I cant recall but all the outlets are wired inline already on the product I use.
No screw tabs, nothing.

They provide a *inline pushin* for the purpose to splice the feed in. I just prefer the leverlocks for this application.
 
  #10  
Old 12-02-12, 03:53 PM
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I've used them quite a bit. For one thing, they seem to come pre-installed in the J-boxes for many high-hats these days. I just don't use those, or any other materials, to squeeze in a splice where there shouldn't be one.
 
  #11  
Old 12-02-12, 04:57 PM
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Just for clarification, I'm using Plugmold in the Wiremold line. Not raceway with boxes...

And they include inline push-ins for the very same function when you need tie 2 adjacent corners. I myself just prefer the Wagos. Can't tie into the outlets and there are no screw tabs, etc. It's all wires -inline- internally to the built in receptacles.

Plugmold Accessory Pack, VPMAP | by Legrand
 
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Old 12-02-12, 05:01 PM
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These? Never used them. I don't use the push in ones in panels, but since they come on some can lighting, I use them there. Not in wiremold, however.
 
  #13  
Old 12-02-12, 06:42 PM
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I have used the Ideal push-in's without problems. I think the Wago's would be even nicer with the way the wire is clamped and removable.
 
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Old 12-02-12, 07:53 PM
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Those clamp-down connectors do look interesting. The "Plugmold" only looks interesting if can be GFCI protected when installed in a kitchen.
 
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Old 12-03-12, 12:54 AM
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Well....I see we've come full circle so there are those here who would use those types of push-ins in their panels to carry a 15 or 20 amp load.
 
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Old 12-03-12, 05:01 AM
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I'm not an electrician but I used Ideal push in connectors when I renovated a bathroom. I had first used them with pot lights. I found them a lot easier and a lot faster than using wire nuts. Especially when connecting multiple wires.

My understanding is that they are UL approved and allowed by the NEC so why the hesitation about using them?
 
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Old 12-03-12, 08:52 AM
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My understanding is that they are UL approved and allowed by the NEC so why the hesitation about using them?
Because they bring back bad memories of using the back stabs on devices which do not have a fantastic track record.
 
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Old 12-03-12, 11:27 AM
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I think I used three boxes of them, and I'm not going to be using them again, as they don't make good contact with the conductor and keep pulling out.
 
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Old 12-04-12, 06:23 AM
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I have had to twist and pull to get a conductor out of the Ideals.

I have and would continue to use them on 15 and 20 amp loads.

The contact area is much more robust than the backstabs on a device.
 
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Old 12-04-12, 02:08 PM
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I have had to twist and pull to get a conductor out of the Ideals.

I have and would continue to use them on 15 and 20 amp loads.

The contact area is much more robust than the backstabs on a device.
I was using the Ideal In-Sure connectors.
 
  #21  
Old 12-04-12, 03:30 PM
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The design of the restraint in the Ideal push in connectors is different than the spring in backstab receptacles.

I could not pull a 14 ga wire out of an Ideal connector. I can't say the same for wire nuts. I will most likely use them (Ideal push connectors) on my next electrical project.

I wonder how much of this can be attributed to inertia.
 
  #22  
Old 12-04-12, 05:46 PM
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I could not pull a 14 ga wire out of an Ideal connector. I can't say the same for wire nuts.
Nor can I. Push-in connectors are designed to connect and hold the wires. Wire nuts aren't. That's why I always make the splice for solid conductors by twisting the conductors together, and protect the splice with a wire nut.
 
  #23  
Old 12-05-12, 06:25 AM
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That brings up the pre twist or no pre twist discussion that has been beaten to death here. IIRC the wire nut manufacturers say "no pre twisting required." I pretwist. My problem with wire nuts is when splicing 3-4 #12 wires. If I don't pretwist I just don't feel comfortable about how well the wires are restrained.

This morning I tested the holding power of a couple of the Ideal push in connectors. Using a vise to restrain the connector (the connector was not clamped) I wrapped the wire around some pliers and pulled.

I was able to pull the wire from the connector but it took quite a bit of force. I tried it again using a fish scale to try to quantify how much force it took to pull the wire out. That's probably not the best way to get a definitive number but I'm confident it was above #20 lbs. No wire connection should ever see that sort of tension.

As best I can determine, push in connectors do not rely on spring force the way that back stabs did. Instead they seem to rely on a mechanical restraining tab - sort of a Chinese finger restraint effect.
 

Last edited by Wayne Mitchell; 12-05-12 at 06:53 AM.
  #24  
Old 12-05-12, 01:40 PM
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Nice test, Wayne. Thanks for doing that!

Maybe I need to say something clearly here. I have no allergy to using push-in connectors. I use them often and, if there aren't a few rattling around in the bottom of my bag right now, I'd be surprised - and looking into my supply stash.

What I do have an allergy to is using any device to make a splice in a space that is not rated to contain one.
 
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