tri fuel generator conversion

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  #1  
Old 12-07-12, 08:24 AM
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tri fuel generator conversion

Hi All,

For those that have done the tri fuel conversion on the generator I wonder if you could provide some advice? I'm assuming you have to pull a permit in order to do the plumbing for a gas hookup at the meter. There seems to be very little information out there to help figure out how to apply for the permit/gas company to size the gas flowcorrectly.

With the tri fuel conversion done how were you able to figure out the gas wc pressure needed on your generator and btu of the generator. The btu/wc information is required when getting the gas company involved to help size your meter. I'm not quite sure what to put on the application to the gas company?

Also when pulling the permits has anyone had problems passing inspections due to these tri-fuel kits on the generators?

I have a honda em5000sx generator.

I am looking to call the gas company to help me figure out if I need a higher flow meter and apply for a permit to ensure everything is done correctly.

Any help would greatly be appreciated to help me figure out this information?

Thanks in advance!
 
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Old 12-07-12, 08:49 AM
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eszeto,

I moved your post to its own thread. It customary to not piggyback on others posts.

There are many variables with hooking your gen to NG. Where are you tapping from, and how Many CFH does the gen use?

Others will chime in.
 
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Old 12-07-12, 11:39 AM
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lawrosa,

My apologies. I'm new to the forum. I didn't realize I was piggybacking. Thank you for starting the new thread.

I would like to tap right from the gas meter and install a tri fuel kit on my generator to run on natural gas.

How many CFH does my generator use? That's actually one of my questions. I really don't know and would like advise on how other people that have successfully set this up have calculated that. It's a honda 5000 watt generator if that helps?
 
  #4  
Old 12-07-12, 02:18 PM
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Hi Eszeto,

Try this link. It gives you an idea as to pipe sizing and how much CFH you'll need.

Natural Gas

I had a plumber do the piping using a "quick-disconnect" fitting similar to that for a gas grill.

I'm running a propane conversion on a Tecumseh 5000 watt, no NG here. It runs SO much smoother than on gasoline.
 
  #5  
Old 12-07-12, 05:29 PM
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The web site I bought my generator from says you need about 10,000 BTUs per 1 HP of generator. My generator is 5.5 HP so I need to supply it with 55,000 BTU.

Pipe sizing will depend on distance from meter and how many BTUs the genny needs. You have to use a chart to figure it out. Page 4 in this PDF will be useful if your gas meter is .5 WC: New Jersey Fuel Gas Code . Your gas meter will tell you the maximum CFH it will handle. One CFH is about equal to 1 BTU. Add up the BTU's of all your gas appliances including the generator to see if you need a larger meter. It will also say the pressure it supplies to your home in WC.

I don't think they will look at the generator and make a judgment about it. They just want to make sure the hookup is legit. They may have stipulations about placement. Such as so many feet from the home.
 
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Old 12-07-12, 06:38 PM
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I need to supply it with 55,000 BTU.
Off topic but droo I did your calc with 14K from what you told me no?

Revisit your thread regarding this.


 
  #7  
Old 12-10-12, 12:11 PM
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Thank you all for your advise. The links have been extremely helpfull.

It looks like my generator has a 11.7HP engine. I'll round up to 12hp just for clean numbers sake. Sounds like my generator will burn up 120,000 btu's. I just checked my meter and it says that it is capable of 250CFH. I will need to calculate the rest of my gas appliances total gas input rates but something tells me that I will be near the max pressure range of my meter.
 
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Old 12-10-12, 09:24 PM
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Excellent generators. I have several of them and will be doing the same exact thing with one of them.

I was actually considering tri-fueling my 6500 but haven't checked on max gas available yet.
 
  #9  
Old 12-11-12, 10:23 AM
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Originally Posted by drooplug
One CFH is about equal to 1 BTU. Add up the BTU's of all your gas appliances including the generator to see if you need a larger meter.
Originally Posted by eszeto
It looks like my generator has a 11.7HP engine. I'll round up to 12hp just for clean numbers sake. Sounds like my generator will burn up 120,000 btu's. I just checked my meter and it says that it is capable of 250CFH.
Is the 250 CFH short for 250,000CFH?
 
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Old 12-11-12, 10:49 AM
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One cubic foot of natural gas is about 1,000 BTUs.
 
  #11  
Old 12-11-12, 03:09 PM
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One cubic foot of natural gas is about 1,000 BTUs.
Whoops! I had a feeling I didn't quite get that right. Sorry gang.
 
  #12  
Old 12-11-12, 04:07 PM
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Nashkat, Yes I meant to say my meter is 250,000 CFH.
 
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