Planning my kitchen electrical

Reply

  #1  
Old 12-08-12, 10:17 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: USA
Posts: 136
Planning my kitchen electrical

Hi folks,

I've done quite a bit of searching and haven't quite found the exact answer I'm looking for (with all these loads). I'm planning electrical requirements for a new kitchen and, as it stands, here's my plan. Can someone please validate or make suggestions?

(1) 15 amp for refrigerator.
(2) 20 amp for counter-top appliances w/ GFI breaker.
(1) 15 amp for all lighting, vent hood and ceiling fan. There will be perimeter, task at a peninsula and under-cabinet lighting (all LED). Not designed yet but the hood may have a separate task light for the range. Also, the sink may have a couple of separate work lights directly over it. Again, all lights will be LED.
(1) 20 amp for built-in microwave.
(1) 20 amp for dishwasher & disposal.
(1) 20 amp for sink point-of-use water heater.

How it all look?
Thanks!
Biederboat
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 12-08-12, 10:56 AM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 14,594
Sounds good.

The GFI protection does not need to be from a breaker. The GFI receptacle can be used at a considerable difference in price and if it were to trip easier to reset instead of running to the panel.

Do you have a stove or oven?
 
  #3  
Old 12-08-12, 11:14 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: USA
Posts: 136
Thanks, it will be a "range" (stove top and oven combined). We're not certain whether or not it will be gas or electrical (induction elements) so I'm going to run both for flexibility. We're also not certain of the location of the microwave yet.

Is there any advantage to having the GFI either in the breaker or at the outlet?

Biederboat
 
  #4  
Old 12-08-12, 11:18 AM
ray2047's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,058
Is there any advantage to having the GFI either in the breaker or at the outlet?
As previously written by PCBoss price and convenience. You only need one GFCI receptacle per circuit. It protects the rest when you daisy chain off the load side.
 
  #5  
Old 12-08-12, 11:36 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 4,259
Personally, I like GFI receptacles. It's easy to test them occasionally (once a month) and if one does trip, you see it and can reset it right there.

Also, most point of use water heaters (the ones that provide near-boiling water from a separate tap) are around 6-7A. So you can easily use a 15A circuit if desired.
 
  #6  
Old 12-08-12, 11:37 AM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 14,594
Thanks Ray, I had the volume turned down on my keyboard. Grin.
 
  #7  
Old 12-08-12, 12:23 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,399
Having two small appliance branch circuits (SABC) is the minimum; I strongly advise that you have at least three such circuits. Maximum distance between counter top receptacles is four feet.

You do not want to have ALL your lighting on one circuit. If that circuit were to trip the circuit breaker for any reason it would leave you in the dark.

Refrigerator can use a receptacle on one of the SABCs. I have NEVER had a problem with a refrigerator plugged into a GFCI circuit. A gas range may also use the SABC for ignition and accessory power.

If your "point-of-use" water heater is a hot water dispenser I strongly urge you to incorporate a switch with a pilot lamp in this circuit. It is wasteful to leave such a heater connected 24/7 on the off chance that you want a cup of tea or cocoa at 3 AM.
 
  #8  
Old 12-08-12, 03:55 PM
Nashkat1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 8,470
Refrigerator can use a receptacle on one of the SABCs. I have NEVER had a problem with a refrigerator plugged into a GFCI circuit. A gas range may also use the SABC for ignition and accessory power.
I like to wire first to the refrigerator off one SABC circuit and first to the controls for gas cooking appliances off a second SABC circuit, if the GFCI protection will be in the first countertop receptacle in each set.

it will be a "range" (stove top and oven combined). We're not certain whether or not it will be gas or electrical (induction elements) so I'm going to run both for flexibility.
If you choose an all-gas range, you will need a 120V outlet for the controls. If you choose an all-electric or dual-fuel range, you will only need a 240V outlet - the 120V for the controls will come from one of the hot legs plus neutral.
 
  #9  
Old 12-08-12, 04:15 PM
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 3,188
Just to be different, I think that two 20 amp appliance circuits are more than adequate. How often are you going to be running that much of a load. One GFI per ckt is enough.

I would not plug a refrigerator into a GFI. My refrigerator runs off a dedicated 20 amp non GFI circuit. That's based solely on an incident where a GFI feeding a sump pump popped and I got back from vacation facing a basement that had been flooded for several days. I will never trust a GFI in a critical curcuit again.

I use spots in a pot light as task lighting over the sink.
 
  #10  
Old 12-08-12, 04:22 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: USA
Posts: 136
Thanks a bunch everyone. Sorry I didn't catch the detail about the GFI receptacle earlier, my bad and I will use as recommended. I do think I'll stick w/ just the 2 20-amp give the microwave will have it's own circuit. I'll also look into another circuit for the lighting (2 separate ones) but I am starting to run out of room on the panel.

The circuit for the fridge is already in and pretty much not going anywhere else. I did forget about the controls circuit for a gas range, should/could this be a dedicated 15 amp? I would think it's a small load.

Thanks again,
BB
 
  #11  
Old 12-08-12, 04:35 PM
Nashkat1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 8,470
I am starting to run out of room on the panel.
Does your panel accept tandem breakers? If so, how many of those do you have now?

A subpanel is also an option.

I did forget about the controls circuit for a gas range, should/could this be a dedicated 15 amp?
Originally Posted by Furd
A gas range may also use the SABC for ignition and accessory power.
Originally Posted by Nashkat1
I like to wire first to the... controls for gas cooking appliances off a... SABC circuit, if the GFCI protection will be in the first countertop receptacle in each set.
 
  #12  
Old 12-08-12, 05:37 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: USA
Posts: 136
Thanks again, sorry for not catching all of this the first time, I promise I'm usually more thorough in reading post replies!

BB
 
  #13  
Old 12-08-12, 05:55 PM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 14,594
The 20 amp small appliance circuit can serve the gas stove receptacle.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes