Home wiring simulation software?

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  #1  
Old 12-23-12, 08:02 AM
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Home wiring simulation software?

Curious, has anybody used or can recommend software that actually simulates voltages and currents?

Not a blueprint template, but something that actually simulates currents and voltages for a specified home wiring layout?
 
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Old 12-23-12, 08:08 AM
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Voltages don't vary from the two standards used in most homes and amperage varies with loads plugged in. Not sure what such a program would accomplish a conventional load calc wouldn't. What is your intended use?
 
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Old 12-23-12, 12:47 PM
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Troubleshooting.
The recent post on current leakage got me thinking, there must be a simple way to
visualize current flow in circuits

Example is to diagram which parts of a run are energized as switches are turned on / off,
or to reflect what happens if a circuit shorts out, or if corrosion increases resistance on one leg of a circuit and re-directs current flow elsewhere.

Example - calculating the actual voltage on the neutral wire where a dual-hot wired multiwire branch circuit has the neutral disconnected at the panel (yes, bad idea in practice).

That voltage value changes as loads are applied to either side of the wiring.

It's not difficult to do with a spreadsheet, but I wondered whether there's a more intuitive visual method.
 
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Old 12-23-12, 02:16 PM
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When you have a load on a circuit, the voltage to ground will always be 120 volts. This is because the loads are in parallel. You would see a voltage drop between the ungrounded conductors and the neutral of the same circuit because they would be in series with the load.

Example - calculating the actual voltage on the neutral wire where a dual-hot wired multiwire branch circuit has the neutral disconnected at the panel (yes, bad idea in practice).
The voltage on the neutral wire would depend on what you are reading between. Remember, voltage is the difference of potential. When a neutral opens in a multi-wire branch circuit (MWBC) the loads are no longer in parallel, but in series with each other and very bad things happen.

I suggest reseaching parallel and series circuits, and also check this out on MWBC's Electrical Wiring: Residential - Ray C. Mullin, Phil Simmons - Google Books
 
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Old 12-24-12, 12:22 PM
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When you have a load on a circuit, the voltage to ground will always be 120 volts. This is because the loads are in parallel

.


What are
the loads
in relationship to
a load
?
 
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Old 12-25-12, 08:25 AM
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It doesn't really matter if it is loads or load.
Load = one item (light, receptacle with a cord connected device)
Loads = More than one item
 
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Old 12-25-12, 09:35 AM
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Google's first site without endorsement: i2WIRES—Intelligent, Interactive Wiring Diagrams
 
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Old 12-25-12, 05:16 PM
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OK Tolyn thanks.

When you have a load on a circuit, the voltage to ground will always be 120 volts. This is because the loads are in parallel.

by
loads
in the above I thought maybe you meant one load is the load on the circuit and the other load is the voltmeter load which is parallel. Need to get out my electricity 101 books if I can find them. LOL

Thanks
 
  #9  
Old 12-30-12, 05:45 PM
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has anybody used or can recommend software that actually simulates voltages and currents?
There are a bunch of free and commercially available simulators, do a Google search for "electrical circuit simulator". I used Spice/PSpice in school, but to be honest, I don't remember it well enough to recommend it or not.

That said, with something as electrically 'simple' as parallel resistance, you'd probably be better off using a piece of graph paper, pencil, and calculator.
 
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