Single Outlets - Where Applicable

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Old 01-02-13, 03:00 PM
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Single Outlets - Where Applicable

Single Outletss - not for power cords outlets for stoves and such, but just single outlets. For dedicated outlets, like a fridge, is it good practice to install a single outlet ?

I've pretty much done that the fridge, laundry machine, etc.

I've yet to see this done anywhere else, except for commercial spaces.
 
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Old 01-02-13, 03:23 PM
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My GDO's are on single receptacles. It was required by local code since they are not GFI. My DW and OTR Microwave are also on single receptacles.
 
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Old 01-02-13, 03:24 PM
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Our local code here in CA also requires a single dedicated outlet for a Central Furnace, although it could also be an NEC code as well..
 
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Old 01-02-13, 03:51 PM
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When you do that, make sure if have a dedicated circuit you also have a matching amperage receptacle.....20 amp breaker with 20 amp receptacle, since you aren't feeding through.
 
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Old 01-02-13, 03:53 PM
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A dedicated circuit should have a single receptacle. Otherwise the code does not consider it dedicated as other loads could be added to the othe part of the duplex.
 
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Old 01-02-13, 03:53 PM
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Does Code require you to have a matching receptacle.
I generally just use standard 15A singles for these applications .
 
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Old 01-02-13, 03:57 PM
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A dedicated circuit should have a single receptacle. Otherwise the code does not consider it dedicated as other loads could be added to the othe part of the duplex.

Not necessarily. I mean bathrooms GFCI are dedicate but are duplex
 
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Old 01-02-13, 04:08 PM
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Not a dedicated "circuit" per se, but a dedicated use, how's that? To answer your original question, it is not necessary, but is sometimes done. Another instance of single receptacles is in kitchen clocks with a recessed bowl for the cords. Old timers remember them.
 
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Old 01-02-13, 04:39 PM
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For example if a 20 amp circuit is run to a simplex receptacle it must match the circuit rating. You could not install a 15 amp simplex on a 20 amp circuit.
 
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Old 01-02-13, 07:05 PM
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My GDO's are on single receptacles. It was required by local code since they are not GFI.
That's a good example of what was a widely accepted practice along with single receptacles for dedicated use for refrigerators and freezers in garages and sump pumps in basements to avoid the GFCI requirement. Today, all of the above are required to be GFCI protected regardless of a single receptacle or not.
 
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Old 01-06-13, 02:40 PM
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Every receptacle in my garage is GFI served - except for the GDO's. All the receptacles in my basement are GFI except for my sump pumps.

I had GFI's in place when my garage was inspected. I replaced them shortly after. I also replaced the GFI for my sump pump after my basement flooded, causing thousands of dollars of damage. All because a GFI popped while we were on vacation.

IMO the requirements for GFI's are getting out of hand. My garage bay is not a wet area.
 
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Old 01-06-13, 05:10 PM
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I had GFI's in place when my garage was inspected. I replaced them shortly after. I also replaced the GFI for my sump pump after my basement flooded, causing thousands of dollars of damage. All because a GFI popped while we were on vacation.
The code has gone back and forth on dedicated outlets for cord connected appliances in garages and sump pumps, at present the code requires GFCI protection. That being said, I don't agree with everything in the NEC.
 
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Old 01-06-13, 07:21 PM
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One thing to remember is that the NEC is about life safety, not preventing a flooded basement or spoiled food.
 
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