looking for advice on buying an electric motor

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Old 01-04-13, 05:10 PM
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looking for advice on buying an electric motor

I'm trying to build a grinder setup: dual-ended mandrel in pillow blocks spinning two grinding wheels, driven by a v-belt and powered by an electric motor. I am a woodworker (not an electrician) and am looking for advice on which motor to buy (I don't want to bother with a used motor).
I do know that I want it to spin at 1725 rpms or so. I've been looking at Daytons and Baldors, but except for the fact that I think I need only about 1/2 hp, there are many other specs to consider and I don't know what I need.
 
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Old 01-04-13, 05:26 PM
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For your application most of the motor specs won't really affect you.
You'll probably use a 48 frame motor.....mounts with a flange and 4 bolts.
Voltage......probably 120V
duty cycle...not critical

Maybe like one of these two:
DAYTON Motor, 1/2 HP, 60hz, Belt - Belt Drive Motors - 3K772|3K772 - Grainger Industrial Supply

Electric Motors-Definite Purpose | Commercial Motors | Baldor Motor RSP3441A, .5HP, 1725RPM, 1PH, 60HZ, 48, 1716S, OPEN, F1, N | B390584 - GlobalIndustrial.com
 
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Old 01-04-13, 05:55 PM
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Thanks PJmax - that was quick!
Believe it or not, that Dayton was one I had bookmarked.
 
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Old 01-05-13, 12:22 AM
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Call me crazy, but shouldn't the motor be TEFC? If the grinder is throwing dust, you will want TEFC to keep the dust from building up in the motor coils. If you already bought the motor and don't want to send it back, consider building a dust shield.
 
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Old 01-05-13, 02:39 PM
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Sparky31415

I'm certainly not going to call you crazy -- after finding out what a TEFC motor was, I for one, think it's an important consideration.

Another question has come up -- some of the motors I'm considering say "single-phase", others say "split-phase";
1.) Do I care either way?
2.) Is it difficult to wire either of these to an on/off switch and wall plug?

Thanks in advance for any light you can shed on this.
 
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Old 01-05-13, 02:50 PM
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You must use a single phase motor since that's what your electric service is.
A split-phase motor uses a centrifugal start switch and a capacitor start uses a capacitor.
Cap. start is probably more reliable.

A sealed type motor will probably run around 190.00 or so. I'll check when I come back.
 
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Old 01-05-13, 11:29 PM
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Split phase motors are actually just a derivation of a single phase motor and both can run on 120VAC, provided they are spec'd that way by the manufacturer. Split phase motors provide higher starting torque than standard "shaded pole" motors. Capacitor start motors are actually split phase motors with a starting cap added to increase starting torque (and cost). If you are going to have a light starting load, then it's not critical to get a split phase or cap start motor.
 
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Old 01-06-13, 09:04 AM
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Depending on shipping costs, Grizzly has a pretty good price on TEFCs

G2528 Motor 1/2 HP Single-Phase 1725 RPM TEFC 110V/220V
 
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Old 01-06-13, 03:10 PM
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PJ, Sparky
Thanks to both of you for taking the time to look those up -- much appreciated.
Is there such a thing as a motor with a switch right on it, or do I have to wire something up?
This one for instance, has this listed under features: "Snap Action" starting switch for reliability

Electric Motors-General Purpose | Single Phase Motors | Baldor Motor L3403, .25HP, 1725RPM, 1PH, 60HZ, 48, 3411L, TEFC, F1 | B389143 - GlobalIndustrial.com
 
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Old 01-06-13, 03:25 PM
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"Snap Action" starting switch for reliability.......refers to a centrifugal starting switch inside the motor for starting it.

You'll need to come up with your own switching arrangement. Nothing fancy. A utility box and plate.
 
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