need wiring help

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  #1  
Old 01-10-13, 12:40 AM
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need wiring help

hello is this diagram correct?
 
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  #2  
Old 01-10-13, 04:43 AM
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Switch Loop

Your switch loop for the lights does not provide a neutral at the switch.
 
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Old 01-10-13, 05:27 AM
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But if your on 2008 or earlier code it would be okay. Why the multi-wire circuit and the extra junction box. If you eliminate the Jbox and run straight to the switch box you meet 2011 and simplify the wiring..
 
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Old 01-10-13, 05:29 AM
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It would be easier to just run the xx-3 cable from the panel to the 2 gang box with the switch and receptacle. One leg feeds the receptacle and the other leg can feed the switch. Then just run xx-3 cable from that box to the light. You can go from light to light with xx-2 cable.
 
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Old 01-10-13, 09:35 AM
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i was using a paint program, any chance you can make a diagram, thanks all.
 
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Old 01-10-13, 10:04 AM
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Welcome to the forums!

is this diagram correct?
That depends. What are you trying to do?
  • You don't need either of the J-boxes between the panel and the 2-gang box with the receptacle and the switch in it;
  • You don't need a J-box between the switch and the lights;
  • To power one receptacle and a few lights, you don't need two circuits;
  • If you want to have the receptacle and the lights on different circuits, just run the 14-3/G straight to the 2-gang box;
  • If you want to do that, you should protect the two 120V circuits with two single-pole 15A breakers joined with a handle tie, not with a 2-pole breaker.
 

Last edited by Nashkat1; 01-10-13 at 11:20 AM.
  #7  
Old 01-10-13, 10:06 AM
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Your switch loop for the lights does not provide a neutral at the switch.
No, but the feed for the receptacle does.
 
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Old 01-10-13, 10:23 AM
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here is a new incomplete diagram. if someone can help me out wire these, would be great

is it ok if the lights are good like that?

i want to power the outlet and lights separately with the 14/3
 
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Last edited by electricjoe; 01-10-13 at 10:46 AM.
  #9  
Old 01-10-13, 10:44 AM
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here is a new incomplete diagram. if someone can help me out wire these, would be great

is it ok if the lights are good like that?
Not sure what you're asking. You're still showing 14-3/G cable from the panel to the 2-gang device box, a "double pole 15 amp breaker," and a J-box between the switch and the lights. Why?

Tell us what you're trying to accomplish, so that we know the requirements that need to be met.
 
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Old 01-10-13, 11:01 AM
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sorry, i just needed the lights w/switch and the receptacle to be powered separately.
 
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Old 01-10-13, 11:26 AM
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i just needed the lights w/switch and the receptacle to be powered separately.
OK, that explains the 3-conductor cable. As stated earlier (and corrected now ),
Originally Posted by Nashkat1
If you want to do that, you should protect the two 120V circuits with two single-pole 15A breakers joined with a handle tie, not with a 2-pole breaker.
The only remaining issue, then, is the J-box between the switch and the lights. Do you need that? Can you mount it so that it remains accessible? Is there a reason you can't, or don't want to, just daisy-chain the wiring from one light to the next?
 
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Old 01-10-13, 11:30 AM
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Here is a diagram. If I haven't understood your needs correctly post back.

 

Last edited by ray2047; 01-10-13 at 12:33 PM.
  #13  
Old 01-10-13, 03:53 PM
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cool, so this would now be correct with the lights?
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Old 01-10-13, 04:22 PM
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Yes though it could be done without the extra box. by daisy chaining from one light to the next.

Please note some electricians would say best practice would be to pigtail the neutral to the receptacle rather then use the bridge. That prevents high voltage on one leg should a neutral loosen on the receptacle.

If this is an area that requires GFCI protection use a GFCI receptacle and pigtail the neutral to the line side.
 
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Old 01-10-13, 05:07 PM
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Just curious: Why do you keep showing a splice box between the switch and the lights?
 
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Old 01-10-13, 06:04 PM
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idk, i'm just new to electrical lol.
 
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Old 01-10-13, 07:42 PM
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The neutral needs to be pigtailed. It cannot depend on the device as the splice.
 
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Old 01-10-13, 07:57 PM
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idk, i'm just new to electrical lol.
Got that, and that's OK. All of us have been new to some new skill more than once in our lives.

Here's why this keeps coming up: All electrical splices must be made inside enclosures that are approved for that purpose and that are permanently accessible. The boxes that we install switches and receptacles in, and hang light fixtures and fans from, are designed and built to do that, so standard practice is to daisy-chain a series of lights. That is, to run cable or conduit from the switch to the first light, from there to the second light, and so on. Introducing a separate junction box into that series may be a good idea in some cases, but it also means that that box must be rated for that use, and it must be accessible. That means that someone can easily find it, open it, and work inside it. In good practice, it also means that it will be in a very obvious place, so that someone who doesn't expect it to be part of the system is likely to stumble across it while troubleshooting or working on this set of lights.

If doing that will help you meet your goal, then go for it. If not, the standard practice of wiring the fixture boxes in a chain is the better way to do it.
 
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Old 01-10-13, 10:15 PM
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ok, i don't understand "The neutral needs to be pigtailed"

yup, i'm just new to electrical terms.

where does the pigtail needs to be, middle circuit?

 
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  #20  
Old 01-11-13, 04:31 AM
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Yes that is the correct circuit

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Last edited by ray2047; 01-11-13 at 04:47 AM.
  #21  
Old 01-11-13, 05:08 AM
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Thanks for the fix Ray.

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