Electric Baseboard Heater Question

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  #1  
Old 01-15-13, 04:04 PM
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Electric Baseboard Heater Question

Hi all,

I wanted to run something by you all and see if it's possible. I understand that installing an electric baseboard heater under a receptacle is a no-no because of the potential of cords catching fire. I have something a bit different in mind and not sure if it can be done. Here's what I want to do.

-Purchase 750W Dimplex LC Baseboard 120V
-Install Baseboard not directly below, but a little off to the side of the existing outlet
-Remove receptacle from existing outlet and use existing Romex wire to wire heater
-Place blank plate over the outlet

First, would this work and be okay from a code standpoint? If so, my only remaining concern is that I believe the outlet in question supplies the next outlet and the next. Is there a way to attach the heater to the outlet in the way I describe above and not disturb this flow? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks
 
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  #2  
Old 01-15-13, 06:12 PM
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-Install Baseboard not directly below, but a little off to the side of the existing outlet
-Remove receptacle from existing outlet and use existing Romex wire to wire heater
-Place blank plate over the outlet
Obviously, the existing romex won't reach to the heater. You probably should install a surface Wiremold box over the top of the existing wall box after the receptacle has been removed. Then, run surface Wiremold raceway from the Wiremold box to the heater. The wires in the box will have to be connected, along with wires to the heater and secured with wirenuts, to continue power to the next receptacle. Put your blank plate on the Wiremold box. Yes, this would be code compliant.
 
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Old 01-15-13, 06:38 PM
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But removing the receptacle may violate the code requirements for receptacle spacing.
 
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Old 01-15-13, 07:43 PM
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First make sure the circuit can handle the heater and you have enough room in the box for the added wires.
Then if your OK with above, add the heater as you describe, but do not blank off the receptacle due to the issue that Ray points out.
 
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Old 01-16-13, 05:43 PM
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The breaker is 20 amps and I figure it can handle 1,920 watts safely so 750 without anything else really on it should be fine. Thanks all for the help!
 
  #6  
Old 01-16-13, 05:50 PM
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Sounds good. Make sure the wire is #12 AWG, not #14.
 
  #7  
Old 01-17-13, 11:15 AM
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and make sure other outlets on this circuit us the screws and not the back-stabs with a permanent high wattage fixture eventually the outlets will heat up and melt
 
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Old 01-17-13, 11:43 AM
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I have one other dumb question. From the looks of it, the heater is designed to be completely flush against the wall. The knockouts are on the back so not sure how to get the Romex in there via a raceway as the raceway would stop at the surface. It seems it's expecting the Romex to come from a hole in the wall behind it. Any thoughts?

Here's the website of the product in case it's helpful. Thanks

Dimplex - Home Page Home Heating Linear Convector Baseboards Products Linear Convector
 
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Old 01-17-13, 12:15 PM
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If one of the holes line with the stud bay the receptacle is in just run it in the wall to the receptacle. If you use a hole at the end you should be able to keep it from being directly below the receptacle since the receptacle is most likely against one side of the stud bay. Just lover lap the stud bay by six inches or so on the other side.
 
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Old 01-17-13, 01:08 PM
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Ok, just want to ensure I get the wiring correct. In the box where I intend to remove the receptacle, I have wires coming in on the left (supply), wires going out on the right to the next receptacle, and new Romex that will go to the heater. Do I wire these the usual way, three hot wires with a nut, three neutrals with a nut, and three grounds with a nut? Thanks again to everyone for your help.
 
  #11  
Old 01-17-13, 01:48 PM
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You also include a pigtail for each group so the receptacle can be reinstalled. As stated previously code requires a specific spacing and removing the receptacle would probably violate that.

I would suggest removing the existing box to make running wire to the heater easier and then replacing with a deep old work box so you have plenty of room for the wires.
 
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Old 01-17-13, 08:54 PM
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Do I wire these the usual way, three hot wires with a nut, three neutrals with a nut, and three grounds with a nut?
Yes, plus the pigtail that Ray mentioned. Terminate the pigtails to the screws,
Originally Posted by braether3
and make sure other outlets on this circuit us the screws and not the back-stabs with a permanent high wattage fixture eventually the outlets will heat up and melt
In fact, change to use pigtails everywhere, rather than relying on the receptacle tabs to complete the circuit.
 
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Old 01-19-13, 02:12 PM
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Any diagrams or pictures out there that show this type of connection? I'm a very visual person and want to ensure I get this right. Thanks
 
  #14  
Old 01-19-13, 02:52 PM
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None that I could find that I liked all of the demo in.

This one from HD isn't too bad, except that they forgot to say that you need to start by lining up the wires so that the ends of the insulation are even, and they are still advising folks to twist stranded conductors into a "rope" before splicing them to solid wires. Oh, yes - none of them was about adding a pigtail.

Here's the deal:
  • Cut as many pigtails as you need from wire that is the same gauge and color as the wires you're adding them to;
  • Strip about 3/4" from the exposed ends of the wires to be extended and one end of each pigtail;
  • Hold the wires from the box together in your "helper" hand with the ends of the insulation lined up;
  • Use linesman's pliers to twist those wires once or twice, clockwise;
  • Add the pigtails into your helper hand, lining up the insulation as before;
  • Grasp gently with the pliers and twist to start the new wires into the grooves in the existing twist;
  • Tighten down and continue twisting until the spiral runs back a couple of twists into the insulated area;
  • Trim the end of the splice even; and
  • Cover the splice with the appropriate size wire nut.
Strip the other end of each pigtail, curl and crimp it around the screw, or slide it into the back-clamp - not the back-stab - and tighten down.

Move to the next one.
 
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Old 01-19-13, 02:59 PM
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Does this help?

 

Last edited by ray2047; 01-19-13 at 04:06 PM.
  #16  
Old 01-20-13, 05:38 AM
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Perfect, that helps a lot. One last question is what to do with the ground wires. Do I need a pigtail on those going to a screw on the receptacle. Thanks all!
 
  #17  
Old 01-20-13, 06:46 AM
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Do I need a pigtail on [grounds] going to a screw on the receptacle.
Yes, and if the box is metal a second to the box. I this case though if you replace the existing box with a deep plastic old work box as suggested all you need is a pigtail to the receptacle.
 
  #18  
Old 01-22-13, 09:42 PM
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If I remember correctly, ground goes to the Green screw on the receptacle. I also noticed the circuit is 15 amp and not 20, but should handle 1,440 watts safely as the 750 watt heater won't touch that. I also assume 14 AWG wire should do fine in this case instead of 12 AWG.
 
  #19  
Old 01-22-13, 10:20 PM
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What else will be plugged into that circuit?
 
  #20  
Old 01-23-13, 04:23 AM
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Just a clock so should be plenty to spare even with the 750 watt heater.
 
  #21  
Old 01-23-13, 06:31 AM
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You should be okay then. Yes, a 15 amp circuit with minimal other loads should be okay but ideally you should think about running a dedicated circuit should other loads ever increase. #14 NM-b is fine for the hook up.
 
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