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Wiring switches for ceiling fan/light combo and repeatedly missing something

Wiring switches for ceiling fan/light combo and repeatedly missing something

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  #1  
Old 02-09-13, 09:48 PM
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Wiring switches for ceiling fan/light combo and repeatedly missing something

A late good evening to you folks. I've lurked and learned off of this forum for months now, and I've finally got a problem I haven't been able to find any solutions for.

I'm putting in a ceiling fan-light combo and need some guidance with the switch wiring. I will do my best to explain the situation.

Switch box 1 (single gang)
12/2 Feed comes in
14/3 3-wire goes out
I'd like to use a dimmer here for the light kit.

Switch box 2 (double gang)
14/3 from box 1 goes in
14/3 running into attic goes out
I'd like to have a 3-way switch for light kit, and a single pole switch for fan.

Attic:
14/3 from Switch box 2 goes to a junction box. From the junction box, it's split into 2 14/2's to current ceiling fan.

Part of my frustration here is that I'm trying to utilize the existing copper 14/3 lines, both the one between switch box 1 and 2, and the one up into the attic into the junction box.

Questions:
How do I wire switch box #2 and the junction box up using the wiring above.
My feed is coming in through the dimmer switch box. Will that allow for undiminished operation of the fan?


NOTE: I will put this on a 15amp CB and will mark the line incoming as having 14/2 attached. This seemed to be OK, but if you feel otherwise please let me know.

Thank you folks for your kind help, I truly appreciate it!
 
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  #2  
Old 02-09-13, 10:15 PM
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Glad you decided to join us. Welcome to the forums!

Ideally you should replace the #14 AWG wiring with #12 AWG, but your approach with the 15A breaker and the label is acceptable.

Unfortunately, you're one wire shore of making this work, and correcting that will require a new 2-wire cable to the ceiling from switch box 1.

I'm curious: Why do want a wall switch for the fan motor, when you'll have to make sure the fan is on HIGH, by the pull chain, before cutting it off at the wall anyway. Not to mention that cutting the fan off and on will probably cost you more on your utility bill than keeping it running 24/7/365.
 
  #3  
Old 02-10-13, 08:13 AM
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Thanks for responding Nashkat... I had to go to bed and hope my dreams would sort the wiring schema out. They didn't.

So I need one hot wire from Switch box one, pigtailed to the dimmer and pigtailed to power feed, up to the fan/light? Why is this?

I'd like the wall switch for the fan for convenience. I'll leave it set at whatever setting and then walk over to the wall switch to flick it on/off. Why does that cost more? Is it like a computer in that the energy to get it started costs more than running it steadily?

Cheers!
 
  #4  
Old 02-10-13, 08:24 PM
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I figured it out, thanks! I had to add an extra 12/2 from switch 1 to switch 2, and it all came together from there. Thanks for pointing me in the right direction!
 
  #5  
Old 02-11-13, 01:48 PM
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Glad you got it. Thanks for letting us know.

I'd like the wall switch for the fan for convenience. I'll leave it set at whatever setting and then walk over to the wall switch to flick it on/off. Why does that cost more? Is it like a computer in that the energy to get it started costs more than running it steadily?
Originally Posted by Nashkat1
Why do want a wall switch for the fan motor, when you'll have to make sure the fan is on HIGH, by the pull chain, before cutting it off at the wall anyway. Not to mention that cutting the fan off and on will probably cost you more on your utility bill than keeping it running 24/7/365.
Starting a motor is more of a load than leaving it running. More importantly, leaving a ceiling fan running 24/7/365, down in the summer and up in the winter, is a low-cost way to distribute the warm and cool air in a room to where you want it, allowing you to set the thermostat so that your HVAC runs less often and for less time each time.

Re: having the fan on any speed except HIGH when power is supplied to it. It is very hard on the motor, and will almost certainly cause it to burn out early.

The fans in my house are stopped once in the Spring and once in the Fall, to be cleaned and have the blade direction changed. So they actually run 24/7/365 less +30 minutes.
 
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