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how do I find out if my 200amp service has blank slots for me to get 220v at 10

how do I find out if my 200amp service has blank slots for me to get 220v at 10

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Old 02-11-13, 02:15 PM
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how do I find out if my 200amp service has blank slots for me to get 220v at 10

I have a 200 amp service.

I need to put a new wire in for 220v at 10 amps. It's to a radio.

When I walk up to my panel. how do I know if there are enough spaces to allow me hook breakers up to it to get this run?

What kind of wire would I use? Romex 3 wire and ground, 12 ga?

What size breaker would I use? 220v 15 amp?
 
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Old 02-11-13, 02:22 PM
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What kind of radio requires 240 volt service?

You're creating a new circuit here and that generally requires a permit, have you gotten that?
 
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Old 02-11-13, 02:48 PM
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We are goingto need to know the electrical requirements before and wire sizes can be given.You also will not find 10 amp breakers.
 
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Old 02-11-13, 02:50 PM
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You say 220 volts, that and the fact it is a radio leads me to believe this was may not have been made for the US market. Is this something you bought on Ebay?
 
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Old 02-11-13, 04:29 PM
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Does it say on the radio 220v 50 Hz ? If it does, that is what they use in Europe. Here in the states it's 240v 60Hz and I don't believe they are compatible.
 
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Old 02-11-13, 09:18 PM
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This is a radio made in the US. It's a Heath Kit final, SB-221. It can draw 10 amps on 220v for a few seconds, less most often.

No, I don't have electricians hired.

What I'm trying to do is get a feel for what can be achieved, or what may not be.

Someone said no 10 amp 220v breakers. Fine. What's the next size?

I also need to know, when I look at my panel, how do I know if I have enough space for 220v 15 amp circuit?

Once I get some of this basic info, then it's time to hire an electrican, get permits, etc.
 
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Old 02-11-13, 09:36 PM
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The model number you gave is not for a radio. It is for a linear amplifier. Is that what you have? Acording to this spec sheet it may be able to operate on 120 volts. Linear Amplifier SB-221 RF-Ampl. Heathkit Brand, Heath Co.;

Follow up: It will run on both 120 and 240 but supposedly the power regulation is better on 240. Heathkit SB-220/SB-221 Product Reviews
 
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Old 02-11-13, 09:39 PM
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It can draw 10 amps on 220v for a few seconds, less most often.
Or it can be wired for 120V input. Since you have 120V hot-to-neutral in your house, I suggest you rewire the power supply for that.

240V hot-to-neutral and 220V hot-to-neutral are supplied in other countries, Not here.
 
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Old 02-11-13, 11:24 PM
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I give up !! You use 220v so the amp draw is halved. Better regulation too.

Other forums, other people .........
 
  #10  
Old 02-12-13, 05:14 AM
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Post a picture of your breaker box with the cover removed and we may be able to answer your question. Also we need to know the make and model number of the breaker box. You will need a 15 amp breaker and 14-2 NM-b assuming the amplifier is in the same building as the breaker box.

Rbig, if you give us accurate and complete information in your first post things go smoother. Had you said you were a Ham needing to run power to a linear amplifier on your transmitter we would have better understood your situation and not had to guess because of incomplete and misleading info.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 02-12-13 at 01:18 PM.
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Old 02-12-13, 12:47 PM
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There are reasons for lack of answers as each panel is made differently and no one here has seen yours so far. In some cases a space saver breaker may be needed etc. however here is the simplest thing I can think to tell you...Normally you would open your panel door and look to see if there are any "blank" unused spaces. Companies usually put a metal removable knock out for every full sized single pole slot there is. Say yours is a 40 circuit panel it should have 40-1 pole spaces. Two of them would combine for one double pole circuit. You should have both single and doubles in there already....So if you have two slots together you should easily have what you need....the issue is if it is near full or someone has loaded it with space savers or the cover has been replaced etc.....A picture would help a lot.
 
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Old 02-12-13, 02:25 PM
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You use 220v so the amp draw is halved. Better regulation too.
Actually, it's 240V - you don't have 220V in your house - and the draw is the same. 2400W = 240V X 10A or 120V X 20A. It doesn't matter. The amount of electricity you use and pay for will be the same either way. Better regulation? IDK

Rbig, can your linear transformer take single-phase 240V?

Other forums, other people .........
We try not to accept responsibility for what other people say in other forums.
 
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Old 02-12-13, 07:16 PM
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Normally you would open your panel door and look to see if there are any "blank" unused spaces. Companies usually put a metal removable knock out for every full sized single pole slot there is.
Normally this is the way it is, but this isn't the case 100% of the time. Some manufacturers will use the same cover and door assembly on several different catalog number panels and in some cases, there are no bus bars behind the twistouts at either the very top or very bottom of a panel. The cover and door really need to come off to see for sure.
 
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