Planning Bath remodel circuit - pros please weigh in

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  #1  
Old 02-16-13, 03:56 PM
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Planning Bath remodel circuit - pros please weigh in

I'm about to remodel my upstairs bath. The way this house was wired in 1966 leaves much to be desired, ESPECIALLY the fact that when you turn the hair dryer on in the upstairs bath, it just about kills the lights in the upstairs bedrooms. Needless to say, because I am gutting the entire room, I'm also entirely redoing the wiring.

I plan to run a dedicated 20amp circuit, brand new wire (this house has a lot of aluminum left in it so there's 10/2 alumiflex to the bathroom).

Here's what I've got in mind in terms of loads/receptacles:

--(1) double gang with a GFCI double receptacle and a single/led nightlite receptacle.
--(3) high hats - I'd say a 4" over the tub and either two 4" or 3" over the sink(this is a small bathroom, 8x8 at most) - likely 60watts per
--(2) sconce lights on either side of the mirror/med cabinet - 40watts per at the most - on separate dimmer)
--(1) 250watt heatlamp/vent - not run all the time
--possible low wattage high hat in the towel closet - 30watt max

Now, I know according to code, I can bring power into the bath but it cannot leave it. In other words, I can't run any circuits which are located OUTSIDE of this room from the circuits inside the room.

I also know that the GFCI has to be the first load on the room circuit.


My questions:

1) is it reasonable to run all of this on one circuit?
2) if not, should the 20amp feed only the receptacles?
3) if the 20amp feeds only receptacles, is it alright to run my lighting off another room's lighting circuit? (I know it depends on how many loads are on that circuit, I mean in terms of code, I can't send power out of the bathroom, but can I send power in from another room?)

This should get me started. I'm a REAL NITPICK when it comes to electrical work. We're talking staples exactly 12 inches apart, romex label facing outward, wiring straight and bends perfect etc. I want to make sure this is planned perfectly.
 
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Old 02-16-13, 04:27 PM
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I plan to run a dedicated 20amp circuit, brand new wire (this house has a lot of aluminum left in it so there's 10/2 alumiflex to the bathroom).
Does that mean you're going to remove the # 10 aluminum and replace it with copper 12-2 Rx. ?

I would.
I would also only put the receptacles on that circuit.

Figure out another circuit to combine the lighting with or run another 14-2 from panel for it.
 
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Old 02-16-13, 05:04 PM
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I would also only put the receptacles on that circuit.

Figure out another circuit to combine the lighting with or run another 14-2 from panel for it.
I would also do it with 2 circuits, one being a 20 amp to the receptacles and one other 15 amp circuit for the bath lighting/bath fan/heat lamp and to eventually power the bedroom lights as well as you replace the aluminum circuit.
 
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Old 02-17-13, 05:17 AM
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@CasualJoe
eventually power the bedroom lights as well as you replace the aluminum circuit.
Wouldn't that be considered "a circuit leaving the bathroom"? I thought that was against code for a circuit to leave a bathroom. I thought it had to terminate in that room.

@PJmax
Yes, I'm going to replace this aluminum circuit. THANK GOD for hvac return ducts and attics!
 
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Old 02-17-13, 05:48 AM
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There's no stipulation regarding lighting circuits leaving the bathroom, only the dedicated receptacle GFCI circuit. It can also serve additional bathrooms in the same vicinity, but not to leave the bathrooms. Reason primarily is that the amperage use of things like hair dryers, curlers, etc., approach the limit of ampacity of the circuit, where it didn't used to do so (it probably did, we just learned to live with it and reset breakers).
 
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Old 02-17-13, 06:23 PM
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The wiring should not be run lengthwise in the returns.
 
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Old 02-17-13, 09:11 PM
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You need two circuits. One can supply everything in the bathroom and the other can supply the loads outside the bathroom. Or one can supply the receptacles in the bathroom and the other can supply all of the lighting in the area, including the bathroom.

The circuit the GFCI is on should be a 20A circuit. The other may not need to be. The GFCI does not need to be the first load on the 20A circuit. In fact, It can be the last.
 
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Old 02-22-13, 07:08 AM
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I'm going to "map" the circuits in my house and see where everything goes as it is now. That will give me a better idea. So, wiring in return ducts is a bad call huh? good to know.
 
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