Idle Time Question - Kwh

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  #41  
Old 02-26-13, 08:56 PM
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So what is your rate, Joe? Washington state is mostly hydro and a mix of investor-owned and municipally owned. Mine is a county-wide PUD (Public Utility District) and the residential rate is flat at 8.852 cents winter rate with the summer rate a bit lower. Unfortunately this particular PUD made some bad contracts with Enron and we are one of, if not the highest PUD rates in the state. The utility I used to work (also municipally owned) for (when in my early twenties) is 6 something cents but they are also looking at a huge increase in the next year or so. I don't know about today but a few years ago we had some PUDs that were less than 5 cents per kWh.
 
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  #42  
Old 02-27-13, 04:55 PM
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I consider our rates to be inexpensive when compared to the coasts, but hydro power like you have in WA is definitely the best value. Our winter rate now is about 12.5 cents/KWH and summer rate is about 2 cents higher. That includes all taxes, fees and connection charges. The rates are progressive so the more you use, the less it costs per KWH. Our power comes from a blend of hydro (some run of the river and some pumped storage), coal fired, natural gas turbines and nuclear. Our rates are about 4-5 cents/KWH higher than they were about 6 or 7 years ago.
 
  #43  
Old 02-27-13, 06:26 PM
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Thanks. The rate I quoted includes a 3.873% state utility tax and then there is a city utility tax of 6% added to the bill. Something like 85 to 90 percent of the power is purchased from the Bonneville Power Administration along with a relatively small (112MW) hydro plant they own supplying about 6%. The rest is purchased through various long and short term contracts and on the spot market.

The utility I used to work for, by contrast generates about 60% of their own power, all by hydro, and purchases the rest from a variety of sources. They used to have decreasing cost tiered pricing but went to a flat rate residential back in the 1970s and they might have increasing cost tiered pricing now. The predominant investor-owned utility in western Washington has an increasing cost tiered rate structure that really bites.

I do not have the option of separating purchase from delivery and I am not sure it is even allowed in Washington state; maybe for the I-O utilities.
 
  #44  
Old 02-27-13, 06:40 PM
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I do not have the option of separating purchase from delivery and I am not sure it is even allowed in Washington state; maybe for the I-O utilities.
In my opinion, you have the best rates in the country, you don't need to go shopping for a better deal. I'd trade you a 30 pack of Bud Lights for those rates!
 
  #45  
Old 02-27-13, 06:48 PM
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FYI here in NJ we are at 10 cents generation charge 4 cents delivery charge. I am on a budget of 78 bucks a month....

Daily avg 15 kwh
Monthly 528 kwh
Last 12 months 6331 kwh...


Just posting for reference.....
 
  #46  
Old 02-27-13, 07:07 PM
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Here is a pdf that lists Class of ownership, number of consumers, sales, revenue, and average retail price by State and utility for the residential sector:

http://www.eia.gov/electricity/sales...pdf/table6.pdf

Lowest cost in Washington state is the Douglas County PUD a $0.0257 per kWh. Now that's what I call cheap power!
 
  #47  
Old 02-28-13, 05:55 PM
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Good info, Furd. Did you see those rates in Alaska?
 
  #48  
Old 02-28-13, 06:58 PM
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Wow, how does anyone afford to use electricity in Alaska!?

Interesting. I just calculated a few days ago for this thread that we're paying a little less than 12 cents/kWh, but the pdf is showing 13 cents/kWh for our co-op. Hey, if that's the average and we're paying less, I guess we're OK. Until I look at my old supplier in Nashville and see that they're charging less than 11 cents.
 
  #49  
Old 03-01-13, 01:59 PM
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Look closely at the Alaskan utilities. The larger ones (more customers) generally have lower rates than the smaller. The range is what I find interesting, less than 10 cents at one and almost a dollar at another. Notice also the number of utilities that are co-ops or have less than a couple of hundred customers.

I don't know about today but it used to be that something like 80% (or more) of the electricity generated in Alaska was from plants using diesel engines. What with the extreme cost increases for diesel fuel AND the fact that it needs to be brought in by barge or tank ship it is no wonder that the electric rates are so high.

On the other hand, these extreme rates make solar voltaic look good, at least in the summer.
 
  #50  
Old 03-01-13, 05:49 PM
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the fact that it needs to be brought in by barge or tank ship
I thought they got their fuel by Ice Road Truckers! That's a good point about electricity being generated by diesel engine driven generation, it's an expensive way to make power, but that method is still in use in a lot of small rural towns across the country.
 
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