installing a GFI with short wires?

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Old 03-05-13, 06:22 AM
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installing a GFI with short wires?

Hey everyone so I want to install GFI outlet and noticed when I took the old receptical out I dont believe I have enough wire to make the connection to the GFI. Looks like the previous home owner maybe cut them to short, how do I fix this problem?
 
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Old 03-05-13, 06:31 AM
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You'll need to pigtail some new wire into place.
 
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Old 03-05-13, 09:41 AM
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do you pigtail off the original wires, I will have to google on how to do that
 
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Old 03-05-13, 09:44 AM
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It's pretty basic electrical work - do you have much experience working with electricity?
 
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Old 03-05-13, 09:44 AM
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It sounds like you're trying to replace a standard receptacle with a GFCI receptacle. If so, why, and why wasn't there a GFCI receptacle already in this location?

Regardless, you'll need to add a conductor to any wire that is too short to extend at least 4" beyond the face of the box, as Mitch said.

Is the box deep enough to hold the wire nuts for the splices plus the new GFCI receptacle? How many cables and wires enter this box?
 
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Old 03-05-13, 09:59 AM
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do you pigtail off the original wires, I will have to google on how to do that
to add a pigtail, cut a piece of wire that matches, in size and insulation color, the wire you need to extend. Make it about 8" long. Strip 5/8" to 3/4" of insulation off each end of the wire. Bend the new piece of wire to form a "U" or "J." Straighten the piece of wire that you need to extend.

Hold the two pieces of wire next to each other with the ends of the insulation lined up. Use a pair of pliers, preferably lineman's pliers, to twist the two pieces together, clockwise, at least three turns. Use the side cutters on the lineman's pliers to trim the ends of the conductors to be even and to be short enough to be completely covered and protected by a red or yellow wire nut.

Twist the wire nut on, clockwise, until it stops turning. Repeat for the other wires and terminate them to your receptacle.

----------

What are the answers to my earlier questions?
 
  #7  
Old 03-05-13, 01:53 PM
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I am putting a GFI there because I set up a salt water aquarium
 
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Old 03-05-13, 01:56 PM
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I do have some experience, I just never had to splice anything before sounds pretty easy to do from what nashkat1 stated above
 
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Old 03-05-13, 09:29 PM
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I am putting a GFI there because I set up a salt water aquarium
Does your aquarium require GFCI protection?
 
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Old 03-05-13, 10:45 PM
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You could just use these:

 
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Old 03-06-13, 04:38 AM
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well yes salt water is very conductive, it's a saftey measure, plus theres a lot of things running, high end LED, pumps etc .
 
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Old 03-06-13, 08:44 AM
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well yes salt water is very conductive, it's a saftey measure, plus theres a lot of things running, high end LED, pumps etc.
Conductivity is often part of the environment when we're working with electrical loads. GFCI protection is an effective means to reduce the chance that ungrounded power can find a path to ground through someone's body. The two conditions do not invoke each other.

Since there is no likely path to ground through someone's body when working with an aquarium, GFCI protection can't play a useful role and is not required, regardless of the level of conductivity and the nature of the attached loads.

In order to properly install a standard receptacle in that outlet, you will still need to lengthen the conductors.
 
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