Need Standard Outlet Instead of GFCI for Chest Freezer!


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Old 03-14-13, 03:38 PM
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Unhappy Need Standard Outlet Instead of GFCI for Chest Freezer!

I recently moved into a newly built house, and there are two GFCI outlets on opposite walls of my garage that are on the same circuit. I understand the importance of GFCI, but I really need to use one of the outlets to plug in my chest freezer as I don't want a tripped outlet to shut off my freezer and ruin the contents within.

I would like recommendations on the best (and most affordable) options for running power to the freezer. (BTW, I don't have any other place for the freezer, other than the garage).
 
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Old 03-14-13, 03:42 PM
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The code now mandates GFI protected receptacles everywhere in the garage.

The code is for life safety. If the GFI trips, repair or replace the freezer.
 
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Old 03-14-13, 03:42 PM
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Welcome to the forums!

GFCI protection is required for all receptacle outlets in a garage. Just plug your freezer into the most convenient one. It should be fine.
 
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Old 03-14-13, 03:54 PM
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I don't expect the freezer to trip the outlet, but what if someone is using a power tool, or drops something (like in the bathroom) and that trips the outlet? I want to make sure that the power to the freezer remains uninterrupted!
 
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Old 03-14-13, 04:08 PM
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A power tool should not trip a GFCI unless defective. If this is a newly built house the bathroom receptacles should be on a dedicated circuit.

Two things you can do is first install a dedicated circuit for the freezer. It will still need to be GFCI but nothing but the freezer wiill be able to trip it. You might want to use a simplex receptacle and a GFCI breaker or use a deadface GFCI and a simplex receptacle in a two gang box. (They do not make simplex GFCI receptacles.) That way nothing else can be plugged into the circuit. Second get a freezer alarm or alarm the circuit the freezer is on.
 
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Old 03-14-13, 09:46 PM
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Ray2047 has the best advice. This subject has come up in the professional forums. There just is no completely legal work around. Unless you can find a 240V commercial freezer.

Trip alarm GFCI receptacles are available.

Trip Alarm GFCI Receptacles

I understand they're not very loud. If the garage shares a wall with living space, mount the alarm receptacle in the living space. Then feed the freezer's simplex receptacle from the GFCI's load side.

This is a plug in alarm.THP207 The Home Protectors | Product Details | Reliance Controls Corporation

This alarm may only work with 240V double pole GFCI breakers.

http://jandjpoolspa.com/pdf/GFCI_Alarm_Systems.pdf
 
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Old 03-15-13, 05:10 AM
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I understand what the code says, but to me GFCIs are simply not reliable enough for circuits that MUST be always energized. I have one in my nearly new house that randomly trips even when nothing is plugged into the circuit. I reset it, and it's good for several months before doing it again.
 

Last edited by the_tow_guy; 03-15-13 at 05:25 AM. Reason: Suggestion removed.
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Old 03-15-13, 05:24 AM
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The reliability of GFIs has been proven over many years.
 
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Old 03-15-13, 05:32 AM
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I've never had a problem with GFCI's nuisance tripping.
 
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Old 03-15-13, 07:41 AM
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GFCIs can fail (just like a regular receptacle) but they are required. If you want a freezer in your garage, it's going to have to be on a GFCI. Sorry, there's no other way on this.
 
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Old 03-15-13, 10:01 AM
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Thumbs up

Much thanks for the input! I am in and out of the garage nearly every day, so the GFCI Trip Alarm may be the ticket! I had never heard of such a device. Now I just need to find a reliable alarm.

Does anyone know if there are non-hardwired GFCI alarms available? Or power interruption alarms that could be plugged into the outlet?

Thanks again!
 
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Old 03-15-13, 10:04 AM
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Originally Posted by md2lgyk
I understand what the code says, but to me GFCIs are simply not reliable enough for circuits that MUST be always energized. I have one in my nearly new house that randomly trips even when nothing is plugged into the circuit. I reset it, and it's good for several months before doing it again.
Unlike AFCIs, GFCIs do not trip for no reason. If you have one that is tripping, then either there is a fault in the circuit or the device is defective. Plain as that.
 
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Old 03-15-13, 10:15 AM
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Would this possibly work to avoid rewiring the original GFCI outlet?

Power Fail Alarm

OR this one?

Amazon.com: Failed Circuit Alarm: Home & Kitchen
 
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Old 03-15-13, 10:45 AM
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Either will work. I kinda like that first one with the auxiliary contacts that can trip an autodialer or alarm system upon power failure. That would even protect you if you were to go on vacation or something.
 
 

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