Installing a Bosch Oven HELP!

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  #1  
Old 03-17-13, 02:08 PM
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Installing a Bosch Oven HELP!

I have a bosch oven with 4 wire single phase 60hz 240volts power requirements. Would it be correct wiring if I hooked the red & black 12ga oven wires to a black 8ga 240v wire from the fuse box (260amp breakers) & hooked white 12ga oven wire to white 8ga fuse box wire & of course ground green to ground green? Or do I need to provide 4 separate power wires from fuse box to the oven? This house was built in the mid 70's & the 240v feed is a 8-2ga cable with ground. Thanks
 
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  #2  
Old 03-17-13, 02:24 PM
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A 4-wire feed is two hots, one neutral, one ground. At the panel the feed is connected to a 2-pole breaker. The size of the oven wires aren't relevant. They are governed by standards other than house wiring

do I need to provide 4 separate power wires from fuse box to the oven?
If you have breakers you do not have a fuse box. Fuse boxes and breaker boxes are two very different things. Yes, one white, two black (or one red and one black), and one bare or insulated green ground. If NM-b cable (AKA Romex) you need 8-3 on a 40 amp breaker.
 
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Old 03-17-13, 03:19 PM
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thank you i well see if we can get it to work now
 
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Old 03-17-13, 06:31 PM
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Configuration for installing bosch Oven!

In regards to the confiuration I asked about for the Bosch Oven originally, would it work fine to power the oven using 2 60amp breakers?
 
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Old 03-17-13, 06:38 PM
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Originally I had said that two single pole breakers can be used in a 240 circuit if the tie handle was used.

In reading further.....that is only true if the breakers are rated for 120/240 vac service.
Not 120v or 240v but 120/240.

Therefore in your application it would be advisable to use a dedicated two pole circuit breaker.
 

Last edited by PJmax; 03-17-13 at 11:18 PM. Reason: Corrected info
  #6  
Old 03-17-13, 10:29 PM
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In regards to the confiuration I asked about for the Bosch Oven originally, would it work fine to power the oven using 2 60amp breakers?
Probably not. Your oven most likely has a lower Maximum Overcurrent Protection rating than 120 amps. In addition, you need to protect the circuit for your 240V oven with a single two-pole 240V breaker, not two single-pole breakers.

I have a bosch oven with 4 wire single phase 60hz 240volts power requirements.
How many amps or watts does your oven draw? What is its Maximum Overcurrent Protection rating? What model is the oven, or, better yet, can you post a link to the installation instructions?

Would it be correct wiring if I hooked the red & black 12ga oven wires to a black 8ga 240v wire from the fuse box (260amp breakers) & hooked white 12ga oven wire to white 8ga fuse box wire & of course ground green to ground green?
No. That would be connecting both of the oven's hot feeds to one leg of a 240V circuit and the oven's neutral feed to the other leg. At a minimum, it should fry the neutral wiring in the oven.

do I need to provide 4 separate power wires from fuse box to the oven?
Yes.
I have a bosch oven with 4 wire single phase 60hz 240volts power requirements.
This house was built in the mid 70's & the 240v feed is a 8-2ga cable with ground.
That's a 3-wire circuit. It won't work with your oven. 8 AWG copper is rated for up to 40 amps of load. What is the amperage rating of your oven?
 
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Old 03-18-13, 11:12 AM
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Your existing wiring will only provide 240 volts and a ground, not 120/240.
 
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Old 03-18-13, 05:12 PM
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Is this Correct?

Just wondering if this is CORRECT and if it should work with no problem before I do anything?

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  #9  
Old 03-18-13, 06:59 PM
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Thanks to all: Ray, pcboss, nashkat & pjmax.

I had my sister post for me because I was unable to. I have been the one working on this. We understand now from what you have said, what we need and what we have in place.

Our existing old wiring is 8-2 romex NOT 8-3 romex, unless I am wrong about the terminology here.. it said on it 8-2.. has a BLACK 8ga and a WHITE 8ga and a Ground of smaller gauge in it.

Basically, the diagram is what was attempted and boy, did we get a big bang. Prior to coming to ya'll for help this was attempted. We did not attempt to COOK with it. What happened was the control panel came on, and everything appeared fine until the door was opened. When the door was opened a very loud electrical noise began to CRESCENDO....quickly closed the door. Very stupidly opened the door again (and I'm talking about for just a couple of seconds each try) and the electrical noise crescendo'd again until a bright blue flash and bang.

Hooked up in the shop now, the oven is connected as you said in the last post in the not-good practice way, so that they could test it out real quick. Experimenting with it is showing error code E 1 1 8 when you go to turn it on. It attempts to heat up... gets a little bit warm... and then cuts off revealing that error code. Now I am determined to fix it.

So that is where we are.

Now I know that this should've been done like the hot tub I did on here a while back with 4 8ga wires to match that of the oven and the special 240 volt breaker.

IN ADDITION:
This is a flood recovery home and prior to the flood a 240v cooktop shared the same feed as the 240v oven below it. This is a physical configuration of a top separate unit COOKTOP with a WALL OVEN underneath it at leg/knee level. Both of these appliances shared the same 240v feed over the 8-2 wiring setup. I am unaware if at the circuit breaker panel if the two 60 amp breakers are single pole or double pole at this time as the house is 330 miles away now, but the 2 60 amp breakers in the breaker box DO NOT have a handle over them both and again I haven't pulled them out to see if they are single or double pole.

Now, besides blowing up the oven, I'm concerned that the wiring in the house for these two appliances, was not done "right" in the first place. The whole hookup of the oven was on the basis that the wiring was "right" beforehand in addition to thinking that black and red together on the black breaker box feed would form the 240v and loop back to the white feed from oven to breaker... though now I understand why/where that went wrong. The 8/2 ga wiring screwed us up.

Suggestions??? ...now that ya'll know the full configuration.

Here is the oven btw. HBL8450UC - Bosch 800 Series 30" Stainless Steel Electric Built-In Single Oven at Abt
Install, Use and other manual links are there too.

THANKS OCEANDREAMS!!! MY SISTER FOR POSTING VIA ME VIA TEXT MSGS!! LOL
 
  #10  
Old 03-18-13, 07:14 PM
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Like this right?

See attached image.

Mod Note: Type xx-2 NM cable cannot be used for 120/240 loads. The bare cannot have the neutral current on it.
 
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Last edited by pcboss; 03-18-13 at 08:20 PM.
  #11  
Old 03-18-13, 07:21 PM
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I am unaware if at the circuit breaker panel if the two 60 amp breakers are single pole or double pole at this time as the house is 330 miles away now, but the 2 60 amp breakers in the breaker box DO NOT have a handle over them both and again I haven't pulled them out to see if they are single or double pole.
No need to pull them out other than to replace them with the proper breaker. Those are two 60A single-pole breakers.

Suggestions??? ...now that ya'll know the full configuration.
You need to replace the 3-wire, 2-conductor #8AWG (8-2/G) cable you have now from the panel to the kitchen with a 4-wire, 3-conductor cable sized to supply the oven's load, and you need to protect the new cable with an appropriately sized 2-pole 240V circuit breaker. You need to connect the oven to the new wiring as shown in the manufacturer's installation instructions.

What is the amperage draw of your oven? or

What is the model # of your oven? or

Can you post a link to the installation instructions for your oven?
 
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Old 03-18-13, 07:26 PM
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Like this right?
That might work. If you replace the two 60A single-pole breakers with one 40A 240V breaker and if your oven needs a 40A supply and if there are no other loads on this circuit.
 
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Old 03-18-13, 08:00 PM
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Thanks for the link. From that, it looks like the Model # for your oven is HBL84. If so, you need #10 AWG conductors. You should replace the 8-2/G cable with a 10-3/G caple and you should replace the two 60A 120V single-pole breakers with one 30A 240V two-pole breaker.
 
  #14  
Old 03-19-13, 01:55 PM
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Thanks Nashkat for the last 3 replies!!

What about the cooktop?

It (separate cooktop with same 4 wire setup and 240v rating as oven) is and has been on this same circuit with a pre-existing oven before and ran fine with the current setup of 2 single pole 60amp breakers on the 8-2/G cable. I do not have this cooktop's model # or amperage rating, but I can say it has 5 burners and 4 wires and 240v rated.

Does this amend your previous post to possibly say I should get this:
  1. 60A 240V two-pole breaker instead of a 30A
  2. Go to 8-3/G cable instead of 10-3/G suggested

Also, knowing the circuit breaker setup now and knowing now that a separate wall oven of 30A rating and a cooktop of likely the same amperage rating were on the same 2 60A single pole breakers on 8-2/G cable... is that a verification that it was previously setup in violation of electric code standards or was it simply just not best practice?

Slightly side-barred issue now (not to hijack my own thread):
Can anyone comment on what might've gone bad on the oven with it hooked up like it was and after only having opened and closed the door of the oven twice for it to have had that blue flash/bang?

Control board physically looks fine, intact, no signs of melting or burns, but after the blue flash/bang there was a strong FISHY smell.


I called Bosch today and found out the error code I mentioned above means that the Cooling fan supervision is either too high or too low. I'm just wondering if the damage was localized to the cooling fan during the big blue flash/bang or if I replace the cooling fan is that likely to be the start of a parade of parts replacements? I see nothing else that looks damaged really.. all the wiring and connectors atop under the top most metal shielding along with the control board physically look fine. What isn't working is the cooling fan and the light bulbs.
 
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Old 03-19-13, 06:49 PM
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What about the cooktop?

It (separate cooktop with same 4 wire setup and 240v rating as oven) is and has been on this same circuit with a pre-existing oven before and ran fine with the current setup of 2 single pole 60amp breakers on the 8-2/G cable. I do not have this cooktop's model # or amperage rating, but I can say it has 5 burners and 4 wires and 240v rated.
That's possible. Let's look at what that would entail:
  1. We won't know what size circuit will be needed until we know the load of the cooktop, so we're just sketching things out for now;
  2. The overcurrent protection in the panel will protect the cable going to the kitchen. Because each appliance is a smaller load, it won't protect them - not even their feed whips;
  3. There are special provisions in the NEC that must be satisfied when this is done. We can go into those if it still looks attractive after this overview.
Does this amend your previous post to possibly say I should get this:
60A 240V two-pole breaker instead of a 30A
Possibly.

Go to 8-3/G cable instead of 10-3/G suggested
  1. No. 8 AWG copper is rated for up to 40 amps. #6 is good for up to 55 amps (although it will be protected by a 60A breaker and might be large enough). 4 AWG is rated for up to 70 amps, so we know that would work;
  2. Because the breaker in the panel can only protect the wires attached to it, I only install this arrangement with those wires feeding a small subpanel in the kitchen. In that subpanel, I install two 240V breakers - one for each appliance - and I protect the wiring for them from those two breakers.
Stopping here for now, we've got a run of 3 #6 or #4 conductors, plus a ground, in cable or conduit, instead of two runs of 10-3/G cable. We've got a subpanel plus two more breakers, so that's three breakers total. Then we've got some cable clamps and other small stuff.

Forgetting about the labor, tell us which way you'd rather do it, based on the cost of the materials and your sense of the work involved. We can advise from there.
 

Last edited by Nashkat1; 03-20-13 at 02:11 PM. Reason: typo
  #16  
Old 03-20-13, 11:09 AM
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Based solely on what I've said herein, does it sound like the previous wiring setup violated the NEC or 2nd question, violated safety in general?

I need to see if there is additional space in the main circuit breaker panel for more breakers. Either way it looks as though I cannot just keep the 8-2/G alone for both appliances right?

...or could I do a subpanel, as you stated, in the kitchen using the current 8-2/G and then just split the appliances there each with a 30A 240v breaker?

Does the subpanel have to be in a location it can readily be accessed or would on the left or right side of the wall oven inside the wood cabinet be ok? - thus if the breakers tripped in the subpanel, I'd have to remove the oven to reset them or I guess I could install a little "door" that would allow me access to this.

If there is no additional space in my main principal panel, then I will have to say I'd want a singular cable run of the 4 or 6 awg with a 60A or 70A 240v breaker on it at the main and the subpanel with 2 30A 240v breakers at the oven/cooktop location.

Cost is an issue always, but 2nd to safety and the best practice setup. I don't want room for cable runs or appliances to fry.
 
  #17  
Old 03-20-13, 11:19 AM
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The subpanel is going to need a refrigerator sized box for working area in front of it. I doubt you will be able to do that in a cabinet.
 
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Old 03-20-13, 02:25 PM
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Based solely on what I've said herein, does it sound like the previous wiring setup violated the NEC or 2nd question, violated safety in general?
Based solely on what you've said herein, no opinion. Are you looking to hold someone accountable?

Back to work:

...or could I do a subpanel, as you stated, in the kitchen using the current 8-2/G and then just split the appliances there each with a 30A 240v breaker?
If and only if the combined load can be supplied with a circuit protected at 40 amps and you can mount the subpanel so that it has
Originally Posted by pcboss
a refrigerator sized box for working area in front of it.
Does the subpanel have to be in a location it can readily be accessed
Yes.
would on the left or right side of the wall oven inside the wood cabinet be ok?
No. See above.

If there is no additional space in my main principal panel, then I will have to say I'd want a singular cable run of the 4 or 6 awg with a 60A or 70A 240v breaker on it at the main and the subpanel with 2 30A 240v breakers at the oven/cooktop location.
If you have a location in the kitchen where you can make that work, fine. If not, you could mount a subpanel next to your existing panel and run from there.

What is the make and model of your existing panel? How many spaces does it have in it (full-size spaces, 1" tall)? Is it rated to use tandem breakers and are there any already installed?

To include pictures in your posts, to help us see what you're looking at, see How To Include Pictures.
 
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Old 03-22-13, 01:06 AM
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I have no need to hold anyone accountable. I simply wanted to know if it was best practice or dangerous, because we used the OVEN and STOVE simultaneously for YEARS with just the 8-2/G cable handling the load of both appliances with the two single pole 60A breakers at the main..... and nothing else in the mix.

I guess everyone is avoiding the oven question because of speculation.... I would simply like educated guesses about it really. I mean if the wiring in it is really likely FRIED, then replacing parts wouldn't be worth it right???? I was just hoping some of you may know oven wiring and where the voltage would've sought to go when it wasn't wired right apparently.

I'm far away from the project/house at the moment. I won't be able to provide more answers or photos till later on. I do not believe there are any empty spaces and this is a breaker box from the mid 1970's.

Please define what a refrigerator sized box is. I gather its probably a junction box of some sort, but what does refrigerator sized box mean exactly?

Goodnight and thanks for sticking with me.

Photo adding - thanks, but I got it. I appreciate the instructions though.
 
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Old 03-22-13, 04:22 AM
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Please define what a refrigerator sized box is. I gather its probably a junction box of some sort, but what does refrigerator sized box mean exactly?
It is a box that a refrigerator comes in. It refers to the empty space code requires in front of the breaker box. If you can't set an empty refrigerator box in front of the panel then you don't have enough space. Well actually the code say 30 inches wide, 36" deep. The box does not need to be centered in that 30 inch space. The top breaker can't be more then six feet high.
 
  #21  
Old 04-23-13, 08:56 PM
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In still trying to figure out what the electricians had done before the old oven/cooktop were removed, I traced the #8AWG (8-2/G) cable back to the main breaker box and it seems the WHITE #8 is hooked to 1 of the 60AMP breakers that are in pair and the BLACK #8 is connected to the 2nd 60amp breaker of the pair (of 60 amp breakers). Then the bare gold wire is connected to the neutral/ground terminals.

So, from what I can tell the oven blew because the WHITE #8 was assumed to be, as it should be, a neutral conductor, but instead it was/is connected to the HOT terminal in the breaker box.

How could this setup have been running safely for years in my parent's house?... let alone powering both the cooktop and the old oven... I know ya'll don't want to answer, but I'm just curious electrically how this could've been working without causing a shock hazard.

I have ever intention on fixing this, but its gonna cost a lot of money to buy all this cable to run it the length to the oven/cooktop and I wanna do it right and run 2 drops for each device. I go back over there this weekend or next. If there is any way I can hookup the cooktop (4 wire appliance 30 amp) on the current 8/2 with Ground temporarily, till I correct the wiring situation there to include the oven operation, I'd appreciate any tips ya'll may have.

They've been living without a cooktop or an oven for a couple months now and I'd like to be able to give them operation of the cooktop at least before I get their oven back to their house and working again.
 
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Old 04-23-13, 09:21 PM
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I had stopped reading this thread because everyone was responding to it. I mostly hang out in the appliance aisle.

You asked what caused the bang. You connected the red and black together from the unit to one leg of 240 v. Then you put what should have gone to neutral on the other leg of the 240 v supply.

You completely fried anything that runs on 120 volts.

In your parents house the red went to one leg of the 240v supply and black went to the other leg. The white was connected to the neutral/ground wire since it was a three wire circuit I believe.

Your unit will run perfectly fine on three wires...... and it has in the past.

BUT.....
The issue is...... if the neutral/ground wire should become severed or disconnected between the range and the panel ...... there will be voltage on the case of the range since the 120 volt devices require a neutral that they no longer have. So in other words.... the neutral side of the devices is connected to the case of the range. That effectively puts the case at 120 volts. If you touch the case and something grounded......like the fridge or the sink.... shock !!
 
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Old 04-23-13, 11:34 PM
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from what I can tell the oven blew because the WHITE #8 was assumed to be, as it should be, a neutral conductor, but instead it was/is connected to the HOT terminal in the breaker box.
Whoa! Are you still assuming that a wire with white insulation that is one of the two insulated conductors in a single-phase 240V circuit is a grounded conductor? It isn't. It's one of the two ungrounded conductors.

its gonna cost a lot of money to buy all this cable to run it the length to the oven/cooktop and I wanna do it right and run 2 drops for each device.
How much money is it going to cost to replace your parents' home? Assuming they escape uninjured?

If there is any way I can hookup the cooktop (4 wire appliance 30 amp) on the current 8/2 with Ground temporarily, till I correct the wiring situation there to include the oven operation,
No, there isn't.

Spend a few dollars for a copy of Wiring Simplified. It will probably be the best investment you can make right now.
 
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Old 04-24-13, 08:00 PM
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If there is any way I can hookup the cooktop (4 wire appliance 30 amp) on the current 8/2 with Ground temporarily, till I correct the wiring situation there to include the oven operation, I'd appreciate any tips ya'll may have.
The 4-wire appliance needs a 120/240 volt circuit. The 8-2 W/G NM cable circuit (aka Romex) was never approved for a 120/240 volt circuit and never should have been used for a 3-wire range circuit. Even when the code allowed a 3-wire range circuit, the bare ground in a romex cable was never approved to be used as a current carrying neutral conductor. Here's the tip you asked for. Don't connect the cooktop 4-wire circuit to it! Rip it out and replace it with the proper 4-wire circuit. Eat out if necessary, but do it right!
 
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Old 04-26-13, 12:26 AM
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Thanks CasualJoe and everyone else who has replied over time here. I really have to apologize for any repetition and/or confusion throughout all of this. I really didn't have a lot of time between posts to go back and see what I had last said or where I last left off, but you all did help very much so.

Confirming that there was a wiring hazard in one of the main most used appliances at my parent's house... well that alone... words really can't describe how thankful I am. I guess we were very lucky all these years that a shock or electrocution didn't happen, though any nearby grounded appliance is not within reach, so I guess mere distance all these years was the reason a shock never occurred.

I am pretty mad though to realize what was done with the wiring and to see how they cut corners there to do something fast. No plans on suing anyone or anything. Just want it fixed right and I will. I know what to do since I've done a hot tub with this same wiring before.

Question: Both appliances have #12AWG cables with the 4 wire setup. Could I use 10AWG/3-w/Ground for the cable runs?

Last question for now: To avoid a conduit box or subpanel behind the oven and under the cooktop, which share the same space, wouldn't having 2 cable runs (1 for oven and 1 for cooktop) suffice? Thanks for the answer ahead of time.

I'll post back and let everyone know how it came out.
 
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Old 04-26-13, 01:06 AM
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Yes.....two cable runs would suffice.

You can use 10-3 w/ground on a two pole 30A breaker for the oven

I don't remember any mention of power requirement for the cooktop nor do I see a model listed.
Therefore it will require either a 10-3 w/g on a two pole 30a breaker or an 8-3 w/g on a two pole 40a breaker.
 
  #27  
Old 06-05-13, 09:59 PM
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I'm trying to get the electrical info for the cooktop, but I believe it will be the same wiring setup as the oven.

If both oven and cooktop use #12 awg and I do 1 run for each appliance, couldn't I run #12 from the breaker box to the appliances or would I need the #10awg for some reason (heat??) ? Trying to minimize cost, but not safety. About to possibly go do this, this weekend.
 
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Old 06-05-13, 10:20 PM
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Ok. Got the info on the cooktop. Pics below:

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So as in previous post's questions.... can I run both circuits the same??

If you were doing this would you run them independently or on one big circuit?

Seems like running them separate/independently would be more beneficial for safety and power demands.... but thats why I'm here.
 
  #29  
Old 06-05-13, 10:38 PM
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Here's the main breaker box this is routing into. We're talking about using/changing spaces 20 - 22, which says "Green Oven", but has been powering the oven and the cooktop both on the same 8/2awg cable feed for over 20 years.

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  #30  
Old 06-06-13, 04:35 AM
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If both oven and cooktop use #12 awg
No normal residential cooktop or oven uses less than #10. If you're referring to the wires in the whip that is not relevant because that is a different type of wire from house wiring. The picture says 9400 watts which is 39.1 amps. You need #6 minimum on a 50 amp breaker. The voltage is listed as 120/240 which means you need a four wire feed. two hots, neutral and ground.

Green Oven", but has been powering the oven and the cooktop both on the same 8/2awg cable feed for over 20 years.
Maybe they were 240 volt not 120/240volt and had lower amp draw.
 
  #31  
Old 06-06-13, 08:38 AM
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Am I the only one who noticed the FPE panel?
 
  #32  
Old 06-06-13, 09:07 AM
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Quiet Justin. We are waiting to hit him with that when the rest is figured out.
 
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Old 06-06-13, 02:52 PM
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Awwwww......
Whats wrong with that panel besides just good ole age? lol


ray - Why wouldn't I want to limit the cooktop to 40amps then? Why the 50amps and bigger wire? Heat? I mean... at 40amps... wouldn't I want the breaker to cut off if it goes higher? Allowing 50amps wouldn't burn out the cooktop or do I have that wrong?

So I'm looking at a 30a setup for the oven and a 50a setup for the cooktop. Damn... sure am glad I got the specs for ya'll to look at.
 
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Old 06-06-13, 03:43 PM
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wouldn't I want the breaker to cut off if?
No. The cook top will only draw the current it is intended to draw. According to the name plate data it will draw 39.1 amps with all burners on high. That means as the breaker warms up a 40 amp breaker would start tripping not allowing you to use the cooktop to its full intended purpose.

Allowing 50amps wouldn't burn out the cooktop or do I have that wrong?
Yes very wrong. The amps are determined by the resistance and/or impedance of the components not the amps available. (Do a search on OHM's law.) Think of a lamp with a 100 watt bulb plugged into a 15 amp circuit. The bulb draws less than one amp but it doesn't burn up.

Is My Electrical Panel Safe? - Important Information About Federal Pacific Electric, Zinsco and Outdated Electric Panel Boxes
 
  #35  
Old 06-06-13, 04:20 PM
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Where does it say it is an FPE panel? I see FPE no where on it.

Here's a blown up picture of it to be sure:
Name:  MainBreakerBox.jpg
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  #36  
Old 06-06-13, 04:32 PM
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Well, since your web site cuts down the size of images, here's the original size version: Link to Main Break Box Photo

EDIT: lol - I see it now at the bottom all worn off..... in full text. lol

So ya'll are basically telling me the whole panel really needs to go and probably ALL of the breakers too right?
 
  #37  
Old 06-06-13, 05:47 PM
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Of course all the breakers. They wouldn't fit in a new panel even if they weren't one of the problems.

It is your decision if you want to replace the panel.
 
  #38  
Old 06-06-13, 06:02 PM
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Your current oven and cooktop project will require two new FPE 2 pole breakers at an approximate cost of $75 to $90 each if you use the old FPE panel, if you can find them. Why not put that towards a new modern panel and new modern breakers.
 
  #39  
Old 06-06-13, 06:13 PM
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CasualJoe - you really said that pretty casually. ... but I mean a new panel alone will cost something like $200. By the time I buy all the new breakers it will probably be $500 - $600 right? I guess I can see spending $200 towards some new stuff, but the investment of the rest at this time is too much when I stand to probably spend $400 - $500 just to do the oven/cooktop runs right.

Since its been put there as it was years ago when it was thought to be a "GOOD PRODUCT", its not breaking any laws/codes by it being there right?

Aside from that I understand ya'll are saying its dangerous... but its hard to wrap my head around that knowing that house has been there since approximately 1979 with that panel installed and not a single electrical incident has ever occurred except when lightning hit our yard/house.

Sidebar: My only concern is the "dust" that has gotten into all the electrical areas since the house was reconstructed after the flood. In August 2012, Hurricane Isaac flooded up the walls halfway and there's been a lot of dust from lots of drywall work and other stuff. I'm just concerned (not to hijack my own thread) that this dust is gonna cause an electrical issue later on somewhere.
 
  #40  
Old 06-06-13, 06:34 PM
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Question

So if I don't replace the FPE panel I need:

1. Oven - 30A 2 pole breaker with 10-3 w/ground of FPE brand
2. Cooktop - 50A 2 pole breaker with 6-3 w/ground of FPE brand

Are there any other breakers compatible with FPE panels? Aren't GE compatible?

Cost: Probably $300 - $400
Cost with new 2 new runs, new main principal/new breakers:
Probably $500 - $700
 
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