Wiring for outdoor kitchen


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Old 03-19-13, 10:39 AM
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Wiring for outdoor kitchen

installing an outdoor kitchen with an overhead pergola. The kitchen island will have three standard 110V/15 amp gfi outlets in series. The overhead pergola will have an infrared heater: 220V/18.1 amp/4000W load. The wiring run from the panel to the patio is about 100 ft. I believe i need 12 awg wire for the outlets and 14 awg for the heater. Does that look correct?

Also -- I plan on using direct bury wiring on this project. Any problem running direct buried through a metal conduit up onto the pergola?

Thanks,
 
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Old 03-19-13, 11:32 AM
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The 4kw heater that will be running on 240 vac will draw approx 17 amps. On a continuous draw device.....you can not exceed 80% of the breaker rating which means 16 amps continuous load. You may have to run # 10 wire to it.
electric heater helpful hints sizing chart.pdf

The receptacles would probably be best on a 20 amp circuit which would mean #12 wiring. You could use one GFI receptacle to protect all three locations.
 
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Old 03-19-13, 11:41 AM
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he kitchen island will have three standard 110V/15 amp gfi outlets in series.
Tech correction: Receptacles are always wired parallel, never series. A better informal term is daisy chained.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 03-19-13 at 02:56 PM.
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Old 03-19-13, 11:48 AM
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You will need minimum 12AWG to the heater, which I'm assuming is a 220V- only heater. In that case, you can run 12-2 with the neutral taped Red or Black. (My $0.02: Tape it red, because it will make the breaker look like it is running double pole, and makes it look a little bit more professional, in my opinion.) You do not need more than 1 GFCI, and I believe that you should have, by the NEC 2011, it be a 20amp receptacle, that is if it is on or above the countertop.
Sparky
 
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Old 03-19-13, 02:31 PM
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I believe that you should have, by the NEC 2011, it be a 20amp receptacle, that is if it is on or above the countertop.
20 amp SABC, yes - maybe two of them. 15 amp GFCI rated for 20 amps pass-through should be sufficient for the device.
 
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Old 03-19-13, 02:35 PM
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The kitchen island will have three standard 110V/15 amp gfi outlets in series. The overhead pergola will have an infrared heater: 220V/18.1 amp/4000W load.
Tech note: The power supply to your house is a 120/240V single-phase supply. You can get 120V or 240V power from it directly, without a transformer, but not 110V or 220V.
 
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Old 03-19-13, 05:40 PM
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You will need minimum 12AWG to the heater, which I'm assuming is a 220V- only heater.
The OP stated this was a 4,000 watt heater, current draw 18.1 amps. This is too much for a 12AWG conductor in continuous use, I'd use #10 AWG conductors.
 
 

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