240 volt junction box

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Old 03-25-13, 04:19 PM
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240 volt junction box

I'm remodeling my kitchen, and moving my wall oven to another wall in the kitchen. Is it an acceptable practice to simply cut and abandon the wire in its current location and wire nut a new wire to go to the new spot? Or do I have to run a new wire from the panel box.I know that would be the preferred method, but to do it would involve a lot more ripping out sheetrock than I am willing to do, if I can get around it
 
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Old 03-25-13, 04:35 PM
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Is it an acceptable practice to simply cut and abandon the wire in its current location and wire nut a new wire to go to the new spot?
If you continue to uses it it is not abandoned. It is extended. Only wiring that meets current code can be extended. Is this four wires, two hots, a neutral and a ground? All splices must be made in a junction box and the junction box must remain accessible. It can't be, for instance, buried in a wall.
 
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Old 03-25-13, 05:07 PM
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I don't know if its 4 wires. Havent got that far yet. The part that is abandoned will be in the wall where it is now. I'll cut it at the point in the crawl space where it goes up into the wall then splice it there. What other type wire could it be?
 
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Old 03-25-13, 05:25 PM
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What other type wire could it be?
It could be either 3-conductor ungrounded cable or even 2-conductor ungrounded cable or in very old installation SE cable where the ground was used as a neutral. You could have conduit and some variation on the preceding using single conductors and perhaps the conduit as ground or some type of older metallic cable such as BX with out a bonding strip.
 
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Old 03-25-13, 06:51 PM
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The house was built in 1978, so I assume its not that terribly out of "new" code. Probably won't do anything for several weeks, as this will be the last thing done on kitchen remodel. Thanks for the assist. Will probably be on here several more times looking for help.
 
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Old 03-25-13, 08:29 PM
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You can trace the wiring back to the panel. Doing that alone will tell you whether it is cable or conduit. Then you can uncover the panel to see what conductors you have.
 
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