In-wall rated wiring/ low voltage code questions

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Old 04-02-13, 10:45 AM
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In-wall rated wiring/ low voltage code questions

My apologies if this is the wrong forum...

Looking to run a simple home theater conduit inside a wall. Looking for answers to the following:

1. Why does a low voltage cable need to be rated for in-wall use? The wood support studs would burn far more and far faster than wiring, correct?

2. Does use of this item go against code? Why is leaving a direct opening to the wall considered safe when fire could potentially come through this opening, melt the face plate and catch something else on fire inside the home?
 
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Old 04-02-13, 02:11 PM
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1. Why does a low voltage cable need to be rated for in-wall use?
To insure that the jacket will protect it during a pull.

2. Does use of this item go against code?
The use of what item? Conduit? If so, the code if fine with that.

Why is leaving a direct opening to the wall considered safe when fire could potentially come through this opening, melt the face plate and catch something else on fire inside the home?
It is, and we don't write the code. FWIW, face plates are fire rated just like all building materials.
 
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Old 04-03-13, 05:31 AM
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In most areas the codes are relatively loose when it comes to low voltage wiring. That wall plate you linked to is not against code in my area. It may be in yours.
 
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Old 04-03-13, 06:43 AM
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There is also the gases that some "Low Voltage" wiring gives off if it should catch on fire. Most cases are not considered on the bases of the voltage used but rather the burn properties of the outer sheathing of the wire. This is why there are two different ratings for low voltage wire. I just call them in wall and outside wall uses. You will also discover that in wall wiring cost a bit more.
 
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Old 04-03-13, 07:57 AM
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Most walls in a house are not considered fire-rated. So as far as fire code is concerned, holes in the wall aren't an issue (un-sealed doors, pass-through type windows, etc). So that plate would be fine.

There are a few walls in your house though that need to be fire-rated. The walls/ceiling between a garage and living space and walls between condos. Any door in these walls need to be fire rated (or at least metal clad depending on your locale) and usually require door closers. Holes need to be sealed, and Type-X drywall is typically required. In these types of walls, a plate like that would likely not be allowed as it would allow gasses and fire to pass through.
 
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Old 04-03-13, 11:25 AM
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I've pulled enough cable that jacketed cable is always my preference in-wall; it's not uncommon for the jacket to snag on something in the wall and tear a bit. If there wasn't a jacket then the wire insulation would do the same thing and expose the conductors.
 
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Old 04-09-13, 01:58 PM
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Thanks all for the responses.

Zorfdt...the wall in question is a normal interior wall. I had the unfortunate task of replacing a glass french door with a fire-rated door to my garage. Not fun!
 
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