Splicing 12 gauge to 14 gauge on 15 amps

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Old 04-02-13, 04:59 PM
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Splicing 12 gauge to 14 gauge on 15 amps

Hi All.

Can I splice 12/2 and 14/2 (on a 15 amp breaker). The breaker is the 14/2 side.
The 12/2 comes from a bathroom fan which I can't access to replace with a full run of 14/2.

Thanks
 
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Old 04-02-13, 05:02 PM
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Yes, you may add heavier gauge wire to extend lighter gauge wire in a circuit that is protected for the lighter gauge.
 
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Old 04-03-13, 07:04 AM
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I learn something new every day. For example: I thought you could run 12-2 to a GFCI and 14-2 on the protected end of the GFCI but not the other way around. I have done a lot of extra work for nothing.
 
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Old 04-03-13, 07:53 AM
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smithdavidp, just to clarify...

You can use 14ga or anything larger (12ga, 10ga, etc) wire on a circuit protected by a 15A breaker. You can NOT use 14ga wire on a 20A breaker anywhere in the circuit.

So if you used 12ga to the first GFI and 14ga from there on out, the circuit must be protected by a 15A breaker.
 
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Old 04-03-13, 01:46 PM
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Which is the way I have done it. 15amp breaker to a GFCI using 12 and then 14 for the protected end which has two lights so I haven't wasted my time after all. Thanks!
 
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Old 04-03-13, 03:15 PM
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15amp breaker to a GFCI using 12 and then 14 for the protected end which has two lights
Where is the GFCI receptacle? In a kitchen or bathroom, it needs to be on a 20A circuit. Also, lights are not usually GFCI protected.
 
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Old 04-03-13, 05:34 PM
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The GFCI is in the garage. Code says that all accessible circuits must be GFCI protected and that all light switches must have a ground. Having the lights on the GFCI prevents hazardous shocks from possible contact with the metal screws holding the wall plate in place.

Would you please state the code that requires 20 amp circuit breakers in a sub panel. The panel has been inspected and approved by the county electrical inspector.
 
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Old 04-03-13, 06:18 PM
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Would you please state the code that requires 20 amp circuit breakers in a sub panel.
No one said that because that is not in the NEC.


Nashkat1 said:

In a kitchen or bathroom, it needs to be on a 20A circuit.
 
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Old 04-03-13, 08:19 PM
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The GFCI is in the garage. Code says that all accessible circuits must be GFCI protected and that all light switches must have a ground. Having the lights on the GFCI prevents hazardous shocks from possible contact with the metal screws holding the wall plate in place.
The NEC requires that all
Originally Posted by 2011 NEC Article 210.8
All 125-volt, single-phase, 15- and 20-ampere receptacles installed in... (2) Garages,
shall have GFCI protection. It also requires that the GFCI device shall be readily accessible.

Having the lights on the GFCI prevents hazardous shocks from possible contact with the metal screws holding the wall plate in place.
No, bonding the box, if it's metal, and the device to the grounding conductor provide that protection.
 
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Old 04-04-13, 03:50 PM
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Code states that sub panels can not have the neutral bonded to the case. The main panel is the only panel that can have the bonding screw installed. I started a topic :Is #8 wire overkill for a 40 amp panel. All the folks that answered were greatly concerned that I had, in fact, installed the bonding screw. It was, however, a trick of the light which made a silver colored screw look green. Evidently I misread the code thinking that it stated circuits and not just receptacles. In any case the inspector said there was nothing wrong with protecting the light circuits but he felt that it was a little overboard as far as my safety concerns go so you are absolutely correct on that count.
 
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Old 04-04-13, 10:05 PM
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Glad you got it straightened out, and thanks for letting us know.
 
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