Running Power to a shed.

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Old 04-08-13, 09:55 AM
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Running Power to a shed.

I realize there might already be a thread here for this, but I want to make sure the answer is tailored to my specific needs for power, so thanks in advance for bearing with me!

Like I said in the title, I am about to begin project at home building a shed. It will be about 150' of wire run from the breaker in the house (completely guessing here, haven't done all the measuring yet) and I'll be building it pretty much from scratch, but there is an pre-existing 11' x 11' slab foundation that I'll be building on. I would like to run power out to it, and what I would like to know is how much power it will require for my needs, as well as the best method of running power out to it.

This is how I currently see myself utlizing power out there:

I'm contemplating running an HVAC unit out to it (I'm in South Carolina, so Air Conditioning will be much needed as long as I deem it affordable.), and I'll need to run lighting, tools, a shop-vac, etc. from it as well.

Will two outlets and a power strip be enough to go with? Will I require additional outlets or a breaker box to do it right? What kind of power will this all entail? How should I go about installing it all? I'm competently handy, and confident in my ability to do what is necessary, but I have net to no experience working with electricity, so please feel free to talk to me as if I am a complete novice while walking me through it, because that's what I am! Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks!

Joe
 
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Old 04-08-13, 11:23 AM
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How many amps will the HVAC be? Will it have electric heat strips. Are we talking a mini split or just a window AC.

You will definitely need a subpanel at the shed and wires or cable may need to be upsized because of distance. Wire would be in conduit at least 18" deep or you could use UF direct burial cable at 24". Can't say much more with out details on the HVAC.
 
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Old 04-08-13, 11:44 AM
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Welcome to the forums!

I realize there might already be a thread here for this, but I want to make sure the answer is tailored to my specific needs for power,
We actually prefer that new threads be started for new questions, for that very reason. Thank you for doing that.

I am about to begin project at home building a shed. It will be about 150' of wire run from the breaker in the house (completely guessing here, haven't done all the measuring yet) and I'll be building it pretty much from scratch, but there is an pre-existing 11' x 11' slab foundation that I'll be building on. I would like to run power out to it, and what I would like to know is how much power it will require for my needs, as well as the best method of running power out to it.

This is how I currently see myself utlizing power out there:

I'm contemplating running an HVAC unit out to it (I'm in South Carolina, so Air Conditioning will be much needed as long as I deem it affordable.), and I'll need to run lighting, tools, a shop-vac, etc. from it as well.

Will two outlets and a power strip be enough to go with? Will I require additional outlets or a breaker box to do it right?
The HVAC takes you beyond the "two receptacles and a power strip" level. To determine how much power you will need, you can do a residential load calculation. You can also specify, here, the tools and light fixtures you will be using.

A small load center (breaker box) may be all you need. You might need to feed it with anything between 30 and 60 amperes. You will need to run four separate conductors (2 hots, a neutral and a ground) in conduit from your house to the shed. Because of the distance, you will need to use conductors that are larger than the minimum for the amperage you need.

You will need to create a separate grounding electrode conductor at the shed, using ground rods, and you will need to bond the grounds and isolate the neutrals.

Remember to have fun, and ask us about anything you don't understand!
 
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Old 04-08-13, 02:06 PM
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I have net to no experience working with electricity,...
Please, go to the public library and check out a few books on DIY electrical work and also BUY the book Wiring Simplified. Wiring Simplified is THE "bible" for non-electricians working with electricity. It has been in continuous print for over fifty years and is updated every three years to coincide with the updating of the National Electrical Code.

Wiring Simplified is written for the layman and tells you not only the code requirements but also the reasons behind the requirements. It is an inexpensive book, generally less than ten dollars and is available from many on-line sellers as well as mega-mart homecenters and corner hardware stores. In the homecenters in my area it is almost always located in the electrical aisle rather than the books and magazine section.
 
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