Help Identifying Capacitors


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Old 04-09-13, 10:03 PM
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Help Identifying Capacitors

Hello,
I was hoping that someone could help me identify what kind of capacitors I need to buy to replace the ones that I have. There are numbers and letters on them but I don't quite understand what they mean (I searched on google but I don't get all of the terms since I never studied this stuff) anyway, the numbers and letters are:

9N
220
25A

On one capacitor and:

FP
9XAF
221
6.1

On another capacitor. These are from a computer motherboard that got shorted due to a powersurge. I'm hoping I can fix it by replacing the capacitors since I believe the motherboard is not getting enough power (makes a ticking noise when plugged in). Thanks so much.
 
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Old 04-09-13, 10:44 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

The 9N-220-25A is a 22 mfd. @ 25 vdc
The FP-9XAF-221-6.1 is a 220 mfd @ 6.1-6.3 vdc

I think I have them correct. It's usually a visual thing as well as part number matchup.

Those switching power supplies are not generally easy to repair. Especially just picking parts at random to replace. Normally you would check the part with an oscilloscope and you would now if the parts was performing correctly. Your supply is clicking which means it's trying to start up and then is shutting down.
 
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Old 04-10-13, 12:32 AM
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Thanks a lot PJ max. I figured since the problem is the laptop motherboard and the power supply is on the cord it would be easier to fix than an actual power supply.

I actually have no idea what got damaged in the power surge (as the cord is fine) so I figured I would at least try to fix it by replacing the capacitors before chucking it and spending $100 on a replacement board. Thanks again for the information.
 
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Old 04-10-13, 12:51 AM
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Ok this may be a stupid question and forgive me if it is but can capacitors that have the same vdc and mfd have completely different numbers on them?

For example I tried to buy some off on the site uk.farnell.com and when I searched by capacitance and voltage rating, a bunch come up but they tend to have different values than the capacitors I have.
 
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Old 04-10-13, 01:17 AM
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Definitely not a stupid question.....there can be variations on size and mounting.

If you can leave me the link page.....we'll check them out.
 
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Old 04-10-13, 02:17 AM
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Old 01-27-14, 05:18 AM
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Can anyone tell me what the "C" in "330C" means on this radial capacitor?
 
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Old 01-27-14, 05:27 AM
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I believe the C is for ceramic...........
 
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Old 01-27-14, 09:41 AM
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I don't think it stands for ceramic.

I think it stands for the maximum capacitance change over temperature rating aka tolerance.
In the case of C it would be 2.2%
 
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Old 01-27-14, 10:51 AM
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LOL!

You guys are analyzing that one WAYYY too deeply...

It's not a "C", it's a zero with a chunk missing out of it.. 3300F.

Mike, there's no such thing as a 'ceramic' electrolytic capacitor like that. Ceramic caps are discs (or some flat variation thereof).

PJ, I've never seen a tolerance rating - especially as tight as 2% - on anything but a ceramic or solid cap - and there the tolerance mark is distinctly separate, it's not in the middle of the Farad rating. Electrolytic caps are standard 20% tolerance.
 

Last edited by taz420; 01-27-14 at 11:12 AM.
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Old 01-27-14, 02:23 PM
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Taz, that was my thought as well, but it didn't look ragged enough. Looking again, though, the upper end of the C and the lower end are asymmetric enough that I'm deciding it is a misprint after all. Maybe a silkworm pooped on the silk screen or something. Anyway, 3300 is a standard value, after all, so that's what we'll use. This is the 2nd cap to fail in this application (Maytag washing machine), so we're going to go up to a 35v and see if we can get more than 4 years out of it.
 
 

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