Who Makes Coveralls with Elastic Wrists and Ankles?

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  #1  
Old 04-14-13, 04:55 PM
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Who Makes Coveralls with Elastic Wrists and Ankles?

When I am working on a project, I find myself making numerous trips under my house. My previous coveralls only had snaps at the wrists, so they shoveled up dirt and collected it in the elbows -- it was VERY uncomfortable. Recently I have been using disposable coveralls with elastic wrists and ankles, and though they are more durable than I expected, they still wear, rip, don't breath well, have no pocket or pocket access, etc.

Question: does anyone make non disposable coveralls that gather snugly at the wrist, suitable for crawling through the dirt under a house?

Thank you in advance,
parkerea
 
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  #2  
Old 04-15-13, 04:13 AM
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I'm not surprised that the disposable coveralls didn't hold up. I've never seen any coveralls that had elastic but it shouldn't be too hard to find something you could attach over the coveralls to seal them up some.
 
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Old 04-15-13, 01:58 PM
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Coveralls

Add some elastic inside the sleeve cuffs.
 
  #4  
Old 04-15-13, 02:02 PM
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Duct tape? I don't imagine this is an every day event is it?
 
  #5  
Old 04-15-13, 02:16 PM
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Or sew elastic cuffs inside the canvas ones. You can buy them at some fabric stores.
 
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Old 04-15-13, 06:49 PM
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OR....don't go under your house, hire Nashkat to do it!
 
  #7  
Old 04-16-13, 01:04 AM
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Back in a former life I used to clean large industrial boilers for an electric utility. We used what were called "boiler suits" and these had elastic pants cuffs, wrist cuffs and an attached hood with a drawstring to hold it close to your face. They were made from heavy denim. I know that McMaster-Carr used to sell them but checking their site didn't turn up anything but ordinary and toss-away coveralls. Doing a Google points out that the term "boiler suit" is fairly generic for coveralls and leads to a lot of false ends.

I would suggest that you look for a retail safety supply store, even a non-retail store might work, and ask specifically for a full-closure coverall with elastic and a hood. It won't be cheap, probably close to or over $100 as the ones that McMaster sold years ago were in excess of $60 each.
 
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Old 04-16-13, 10:25 AM
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OR....don't go under your house, hire Nashkat to do it!
Ha, Ha! My least favorite pert of working in a tight dirt crawl space is scooting forward on my back and scooping dirt into my collar. Yuck!

A plumber buddy of mine spent every workday for 3 months in those conditions as part of the restoration work on the Ryman. He liked the scale pay and the actual work, but not so much the site!
 
  #9  
Old 04-16-13, 11:24 AM
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Here plumbers carry rolls of tar paper. Cut off a piece, roll up, then unroll in front of you as you crawl. Throw away when you're through. Easy and cheap.
 
  #10  
Old 04-16-13, 02:49 PM
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That's not a bad idea if you're doing a small residential repair under a dwelling.
 
  #11  
Old 04-16-13, 04:30 PM
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Good size pieces of cardboard work even better but not always easy to find.
 
  #12  
Old 04-16-13, 05:29 PM
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Of course 90% of the new houses are on slabs and electric and potable water lines are in the attic. Even those that are block and beam often require a shovel to get underneath.

Amazingly some builders are beginning to realize a concrete slab eight inches off the ground in an area that floods a couple of times a year isn't such a good idea and are pushing a revolutionary idea, block and beam. I'll bet the old timers are laughing. I have had more than a foot of water in my yard but no sweat. I have an old block and beam house.
 
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Old 04-16-13, 05:56 PM
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I had a Tyvek painters coveralls that I used once. They were quite durable and were not hot. I don't recall if they had elastic cuffs though. They were in the paint section of the big orange store.
 
  #14  
Old 04-19-13, 10:24 PM
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Heh... THIS came to mind...
 
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