Correct method to wire consecutive outlets

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Old 05-07-13, 12:43 PM
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Correct method to wire consecutive outlets

Work is being done on a new home in Saskatoon, SK, Canada.

I am wiring my basement outlets and have done enough research to be confident with the requirements and electrical codes.

I only whope to have clearly and methodically explained to me the proper was to wire consecutive outlets.

I am using metal boxes and 14 gauge wire. Hot and Neutral are straight forward enough, but can someone explain to me the ground wire procedure? Is it necessary to wire nut both ground wires and have a pigtail to the outlet, or is it sufficient to ground the line wire to the box and to the outlet, then ground the load wire only to the box and carry on (if that makes sense)
 
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Old 05-07-13, 12:47 PM
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A good reason to use plastic boxes if local code permits because it eliminates one thing to be grounded (bonded). With metal boxes you normally pigtail to the recptaccl and the box. They do make self-grounding devices that require only grounding to the box. Switches under NEC don't require a separate ground wire if installed in a metal box. CEC may vary.
 
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Old 05-07-13, 02:55 PM
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Smile Correct method to wire consecutive outlets

There are two keys to successfully wiring consecutive electrical receptacles. First, the amps of the breaker used for this must remain within the guidelines of the load the receptacles could carry at the same time. For example, three receptacles on the same circuit with a 15-amp breaker cannot support six appliances requiring three amps each at the same time. Second, the gauge of the wires in the cable used to connect the receptacles must meet requirements based on the amps of the breaker in the electrical panel.



For a 15 amp circuit measure and cut enough 14-2 cable with the cable cutters to reach from the electrical panel to the first receptacle and then from one receptacle to the next. Cut and install any electrical conduit necessary. If this installation is inside the house, conduit is not necessary. Wrap electrical tape around the end of the cable at the electrical panel and staple the cable in place as you run it to the first receptacle.

Remove the outer cover from the cable with a utility knife to expose at least 6 inches of the wires. Strip of the insulation from each wire with wire strippers using the strip gauge on the back of the device for the proper length to strip. The black wire is the hot wire, the white is the neutral, and the bare (or green) wire is the ground.

Connect the black to the brass and the white to the silver screws making a clockwise loop around the screw. Connect the ground wire to the green terminal screw. Be certain the black and white wires are opposite each other. All grounds need to be spliced together and the the devices and the box if metal.

Connect the black wire from the cable cut to connect the first receptacle to the second on the same side of the receptacle as the first black wire. Do the same with the white. Connect the wires to the second receptacle in the same manner as the first. Repeat this with the next receptacle as well.

Cut away the outer covering on the cable at the electrical panel. Insert a cable clamp into the knockout and insert the cable into the clamp. Strip the ends of the wires as before. Secure the black wire to the breaker, the white wire to the neutral bus with the other white wires only one white per hole, and the bare or green wire to the ground bus. Turn the main breaker in the electrical panel off, install the new breaker and turn it off. Turn the main breaker on, followed by the new one.

Warnings:

Connect the wires to the side terminals with a screwdriver if the receptacles don't have connection holes on the back of them.
Never work with live electricity.
 

Last edited by pcboss; 05-07-13 at 04:43 PM. Reason: -2 was -3 cable, removed aluminum comment
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Old 05-07-13, 03:09 PM
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Connect the wires to the side terminals with a screwdriver if the receptacles don't have connection holes on the back of them
Best practice always use the screws not the back stabs. Back stabs are unreliable over time because only a light spring makes contact.

Note: Backstabs should not be confused with back wired receptacles that have a presure plate tightened by a screw. Those are excellent but usually only found on GFCIs or more expensive commercial grade receptacles.
 
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Old 05-07-13, 08:47 PM
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Welcome to the forums!

There are two keys to successfully wiring consecutive electrical receptacles. First, the amps of the breaker used for this must remain within the guidelines of the load the receptacles could carry at the same time. For example, three receptacles on the same circuit with a 15-amp breaker cannot support six appliances requiring three amps each at the same time.
The standard design value for receptacles is 1.5 amps each.

Second, the gauge of the wires in the cable used to connect the receptacles must meet requirements based on the amps of the breaker in the electrical panel.
IOW, the conductors in a 15A circuit must be #14 AWG or larger. The conductors in a 20A circuit must be #12 AWG or larger.

Remove the outer cover from the cable with a utility knife to expose at least 6 inches of the wires.
Or use a cable stripper.

Strip of the insulation from each wire with wire strippers using the strip gauge on the back of the device for the proper length to strip. The black wire is the hot wire, the white is the neutral, and the bare (or green) wire is the ground.
Typically, but not always, especially in lighting circuits. For receptacles, you should try to stay with these adopted norms.

Connect the black wire from the cable cut to connect the first receptacle to the second on the same side of the receptacle as the first black wire. Do the same with the white. Connect the wires to the second receptacle in the same manner as the first. Repeat this with the next receptacle as well.
When you have two or more cables in a box, it is better to splice each function together and add a pigtail - a 6" to 8" piece of wire the same color and gauge as the wires in the cables - to connect to the device.

Cut away the outer covering on the cable at the electrical panel. Insert a cable clamp into the knockout and insert the cable into the clamp. Strip the ends of the wires as before. Secure the black wire to the breaker, the white wire to the neutral bus with the other white wires only one white per hole, and the bare or green wire to the ground bus.
If your panel contains the first overcurrent protection device, which most do, then you will probably have only one bus for both the neutrals and the grounds. Attach them as described - only one neutral under one screw and, if your panel allows it, up to two grounds per screw. Never a ground and a neutral under the same screw and the two ground wires under one screw must be the same gauge.
 
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