Splitting 220V circuit

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  #1  
Old 05-07-13, 04:02 PM
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Splitting 220V circuit

I am planning to run a 20 amp 220 volt line to my attic. in the attic I want to power base board heating in the winter and split off a 5 foot run to an air-conditioner for the summer. I will be using 10 gauge wire. will splicing the wire be a safety problem.
 
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Old 05-07-13, 05:20 PM
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will splicing the wire be a safety problem.
Splicing is not a problem if it is done in a box that will remain accessible.
 
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Old 05-07-13, 05:25 PM
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Your home does not have 220. It has 240. Splicing is not a problem. You can use 12-2 on a 20 amp circuit. The white wire of the cable will need to be recolored as an ungrounded conductor either by recoloring with tape or fel tip marker at each splice and connection point. Usual colors are red or black but any color but gray or green may be used.
 
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Old 05-08-13, 03:12 PM
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Thank You for the reply.
The AC unit has a three prong plug. I was going to run a Three wire cable. Am I correct in assuming the white stays white?
 
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Old 05-08-13, 04:02 PM
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I am planning to run a 20 amp [240] volt line to my attic.
Originally Posted by ray2047
The white wire of the cable will need to be recolored as an ungrounded conductor either by recoloring with tape or felt tip marker at each splice and connection point. Usual colors are red or black but any color but gray or green may be used.
The AC unit has a three prong plug. I was going to run a Three wire cable. Am I correct in assuming the white stays white?
No. In a 240V circuit, there are two ungrounded conductors. Each of those is connected to, fed by and protected by one half of a 2-pole 240V circuit breaker. There is no grounded conductor, or neutral.

3-wire cables have two insulated wires and one uninsulated wire. The uninsulated wire is the grounding conductor. The two insulated wires may be used as either one ungrounded (hot) conductor and one grounded (neutral) conductor, for a 120V circuit, or as two ungrounded conductors for a 240V circuit. In a 240V circuit, when they are both used as ungrounded conductors, the white wire must be marked as Ray described.

Does your A/C unit take 240V or 120V?
 
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Old 05-08-13, 05:32 PM
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The AC unit has a three prong plug.
One ground prong and two hot prongs if it is a 240 volt AC.
 
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Old 05-08-13, 05:38 PM
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The manufacture rating 230v. I have another 230v line installed by the previous owner by a licensed electrician has three wires. Red, black and white running to the main panel. The white is connected to the neutral bar.
 
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Old 05-08-13, 06:42 PM
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I have another 230v line installed by the previous owner by a licensed electrician has three wires. Red, black and white running to the main panel. The white is connected to the neutral bar.
Since you live in the US, you don't have any 230V circuits. We'll assume you're talking about a 240V circuit.

It sounds like the white-insulated wire is being used as a ground. If so, that doesn't conform to code. One question: You live in NY. Where? Do you have cable or conduit in your house? Which does your local jurisdiction require?

What prompted me to ask is that there are no cables, AFAIK, that have a red, black and white conductor and have no ground conductor.

Since your A/C unit is rated for 230V it should be able to handle up to 253V. It should work fine on a 240V circuit.

One more question: Why are you planning to add heating and cooling in your attic?
 
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Old 05-09-13, 03:29 AM
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Generally a device that is wired in directly (no plug and receptacle) should have its own circuit if it would use more than half the capacity of a circuit. For example a heater that uses 11 amps should have its own 15 or 20 amp circuit. Also heaters and A/C units must have circuits such that their operating amperes is no more than 80% of the wiring and breaker ratings (continuous vs. intermittent loads).

New circuits must be grounded using cables with a bare or green conductor. If it is 240 (230, 220, 208) volt-only, then it is permissible to use a 2 conductor cable (black/white/bare) cable.

Existing circuits that do not meet current code (e.g. no ground) may not be extended (added onto).
 
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Old 05-09-13, 05:16 AM
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The manufacture rating 230v. I have another 230v line installed by the previous owner by a licensed electrician has three wires. Red, black and white running to the main panel. The white is connected to the neutral bar.
It sounds like the white-insulated wire is being used as a ground. If so, that doesn't conform to code. One question: You live in NY. Where? Do you have cable or conduit in your house? Which does your local jurisdiction require?
Another possibility is they ran 3-conductor cable and capped the neutral, which is what I prefer to do personally.
 
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Old 05-11-13, 01:42 PM
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What problem would I have if I connected the white to the ground at the receptacle and the neutral bar at the panel.
 
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Old 05-11-13, 02:08 PM
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You would have a code violation. Grounds #6 and smaller must be factory colored. They can not be another color redesignated. Electrically it would work. I have heard off stripping off all of the white insulation on both ends but I can't comment code wise on that.
 
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Old 05-11-13, 02:25 PM
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I have Green Electrical tape?
 
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Old 05-11-13, 03:10 PM
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If the wire was #4 or larger green marking tape would be compliant but your wire is smaller then #4.

All we can do is advise you on code. You option whether are not to follow code. In this case not unsafe but not code.
 
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Old 05-11-13, 04:13 PM
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Thank You for the replies. Its been very helpful.
 
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