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New wiring for outlets in existing 16x8x4 exterior block wall

New wiring for outlets in existing 16x8x4 exterior block wall

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  #1  
Old 05-19-13, 10:34 PM
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New wiring for outlets in existing 16x8x4 exterior block wall

I need to correct some wiring on an outside block construction wall. The block is 16x8x4 and I want to run the wiring horizontally.

I thought about using wiremold but was unsure about 120 volt wiring on the surface of the interior wall. I also considered knockings out the interior wall and placing conduit below the surface than repairing the surface with skin coat and finished coatings.

I know the surface system would be the easiest but I want to what would be the best in the long run.

Does anyone have a suggestions on which technique would be the best and if surface mounted, which series of raceway would be the best. I intend to run 12 ga wire with ground and place an outlet every 6 feet of run according to current code.
 
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Old 05-19-13, 11:57 PM
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Could you please post some pictures to show us what you're up against? I'm sure we could provide better ideas then.
 
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Old 05-20-13, 08:44 AM
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I wouldn't break the blocks to run the wires, it seems like way more work than is necessary and could become a structural issue depending on how much you intend on removing.

Typically, conduit is used on masonry walls between boxes. I would use 1/2" EMT between boxes and pull 3 THHN wires (black/white/green) between each. Mount the boxes and the conduit straps with plastic masonry anchors. If you need a few bends, they sell pre-bent fittings to make it even easier.

It'll look clean, be safe, and meet your requirements.

FYI, unfinished spaces (basement/garage/etc) don't follow the 6/12 requirement, so you don't need all those receptacles per code. You do need GFI protection though for any unfinished space.
Also, even if the space is finished, code dictates that you need a receptacle within 6' of a doorway and every 12' from there.
 
  #4  
Old 05-20-13, 09:28 AM
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Welcome to the forums!

We will need some additional information in order to focus our advice. What is your goal and what is your present situation?

You say
I need to correct some wiring on an outside block construction wall... I also considered knockings out the interior wall and placing conduit below the surface than...
Is this inside or outside?

Wiring can be installed in a wall constructed of concrete masonry units (CMUs, or "concrete blocke") that have voids be installing it in conduit run vertically through the voids. Opening or removing the faces of the CMUs, and punching through a course of webs, damages structural integrity and should not be done.

I know the surface system would be the easiest but I want to what would be the best in the long run.
That depends, in part, on what you want to wind up with.

I thought about using wiremold but was unsure about 120 volt wiring on the surface of the interior wall.
Wiremold is one company that makes a variety of products designed for doing that. What is your concern?

I intend to run 12 ga wire with ground and place an outlet every 6 feet of run according to current code.
Assuming you're talking about the spacing of receptacles in a dwelling unit, the NEC requirement is
Dwelling Unit Receptacle Outlet Requirements [210-52(a)]
(a) Dwelling Unit Receptacle Outlet Placement. A receptacle shall be installed in every kitchen, family room, dining room, living room, parlor, libraries, den, sun room, bedroom, recreation rooms, and other similar rooms or areas according to (1) through (3).

(1) Spacing. A receptacle outlet must be installed so that no point along the wall space will be more than 6 feet (measured horizontally) from a receptacle outlet.

(2) Wall Space. Wall space is considered walls, fixed exterior glass, bar-counter and railing that are at least 2 feet long, unbroken along the floor line by doors or fireplaces. Sliding glass doors on exterior walls are not considered wall space.

The purpose of this rule in the placement of receptacles is to avoid the use of extension cords across openings such as doors.

Source: Mike Holt NEC Code Tips
Are you planning to do this in your home, your workshop or garage, a commercial space, or somewhere else?
 
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