How Do I Add Outdoor Outlet?

Reply

  #1  
Old 05-24-13, 12:19 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 10
How Do I Add Outdoor Outlet?

Currently I have an outlet just inside the door and I want to add another GFCI outlet outdoor just outside the door but I don't want to lose the indoor outlet. Hehe sorry hope I'm not confusing anyone...

I know how to install it after I get the wires out but my problem is after I cut into the siding and have access to the electric wires how can I splice/tap into the electric without losing the inside outlet?

I've tried searching some youtube videos but it seems all the videos show is pulling out a wire that's already an end piece. I'm doubting that after I get inside the wall there is going to be a readily available end piece I can just use, especially since I already have an outlet on the inside.

I'm going to be installing a GFCI outlet.

Thanks for reading, if you have a youtube video to suggestion that would be a big help. I've tried searching but don't know exactly what 'keywords' to use to pull up exactly what I'm looking for.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 05-24-13, 01:18 PM
Nashkat1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 8,470
I have an outlet just inside the door and I want to add another GFCI outlet outdoor just outside the door but I don't want to lose the indoor outlet.
Mount the box for the outdoor receptacle in the same stud bay but to one side of the inside box. Feed a piece of Type NM cable (Romex) from inside one box to inside the other. In the inside box, splice the wires in the new cable to the wires in the old cable and add a pigtail to each splice to connect to the inside receptacle.
 
  #3  
Old 05-24-13, 01:24 PM
core's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Des Moines, IA
Posts: 1,127
What you will do is run a short new cable from the existing receptacle box to the new one. You don't just cut the siding and tap into the cable wherever you please. Make the splice/connection in the existing receptacle box. That's the start of your new cable. The other end of that cable may be directly opposite it, just a few inches away. Then you may follow your 'youtube master electrician in 21 hours' clip to finish the install.

Have you considered a good book instead of trusting youtube jockeys? "Wiring Simplified" is highly rated around these parts.

Edit- Check to see whether the existing receptacle box cable is 12 gauge or 14 gauge before you buy cable. It will say so on the sheath but you may not have a good view from inside the box. If it's yellow it's definitely 12. If you're not sure it would be better to buy 12 gauge. You can take a picture with a tape measure if you don't have a wire gauge and surely someone here will tell you rather quickly.
 
  #4  
Old 05-24-13, 01:44 PM
Nashkat1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 8,470
The other end of that cable may be directly opposite it, just a few inches away.
If you're going to use a surface-mounted box for the outdoor receptacle you can mount it directly opposite the indoor box. If you're going to use a recessed box, go to the side. The odds are that the wall won't be thick enough to allow two recessed boxes back-to-back.

Wiring Simplified
 
  #5  
Old 05-24-13, 07:16 PM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 14,587
What room is the existing receptacle in? Some circuits are limited and should not be tapped for power for other areas.

Along with the weatherproof box if mounted outside and the weather-resistant GFI you will also need a weatherproof in use bubble cover.
 
  #6  
Old 05-24-13, 07:35 PM
Nashkat1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 8,470
Along with the weatherproof box if mounted outside and the weather-resistant GFI...
If for some reason the circuit you tap off of already has GFCI protection, you can install a standard receptacle outside. The new receptacle will still need to be weather resistant, of course.

Kitchen/dining receptacles, bathroom receptacles and laundry receptacle would not be a source of power even though they are GFI protected.
 

Last edited by pcboss; 05-25-13 at 05:55 PM.
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes