Basement Bathroom Question

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  #1  
Old 05-26-13, 03:57 PM
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Basement Bathroom Question

Finishing my basement and am starting on last corner. If you look at picture the electrical box is close to rough-in plumbing for bathroom. Can I build a closet around the electrical box with a door? It would have clearance of 36" when open. The closet would be attached to the wall of the bathroom. Also can you have the closet in a room? Not in the bathroom but would have to enter the area through a door.
 
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  #2  
Old 05-26-13, 11:38 PM
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Also can you have the closet in a room? Not in the bathroom but would have to enter the area through a door.
Say what


I see what you have drawn. You want to build a closet around the panel. Do you want to build another closet around the panel closet ?
 
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Old 05-27-13, 03:01 AM
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I don't see the need in "double" closets. If you have a closet separating the panel from the bathroom, it will suffice. Placing another closet in there will hamper access, IMO.
 
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Old 05-27-13, 04:31 AM
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So can I have a closet in the bathroom that has the electrical panel in it?

In my picture the black line represents a bathroom wall. That wall would actually be the wall facing the panel. Then a LH door on the closet to swing to that wall to keep the clearance of the panel.

If I could just put an electrical closet in the bathroom that would be great.
 
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Old 05-27-13, 05:00 AM
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It may bring in different interpretations, but technically, no. No electrical panels in bathrooms. You will have access directly from the bathroom to the panel, so it may violate that rule. Having the wall and an end door would separate the panel completely from the bathroom. Hang in for others to chime in on this, as it may or may not fly.
 
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Old 05-27-13, 06:54 AM
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This is an electrical question not a bath question so I have moved it.

A closet must be large enough to allow a 30"wide* by 36" deep space for the panel. It can not be used for storage. That is the gotcha that can get it rejected by an inspector. How do you prove it won't be used for storage? Usual rule of thumb for residential is no panels in closets.
*Panel does not need to be centered in the 30" space.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 06-01-13 at 09:34 AM.
  #7  
Old 06-01-13, 09:25 AM
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hide the panel behind a hinged cabinet door to match your bathroom cabinets or hang a mirror

I thought no panels in bathrooms?
 
  #8  
Old 06-01-13, 09:32 AM
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OOps was out to lunch that day. My original post will be edited.

240.24 Location in or on Premises.
(E) Not Located in Bathrooms. In dwelling units and guest rooms or guest suites of hotels and motels, overcurrent devices, other than supplementary overcurrent protection, shall not be located in bathrooms.
Source: 2008 NEC.

See also: Safely Installing Electrical and Service Panels in Residential Closets | EC Mag
 

Last edited by ray2047; 06-01-13 at 09:49 AM.
  #9  
Old 06-01-13, 09:39 AM
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So if I had a wall with a door that entered to the area in the pic, and then there was the bathroom with a door. Could the electrical panel be where it is at on the other side of the bathroom wall?
 
  #10  
Old 06-01-13, 09:51 AM
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All I can say is ask the inspector how he would view the space. We can't know what he would say.

NEC 2008:
240.24 (D) Not in Vicinity of Easily Ignitible Material. Overcur-
rent devices shall not be located in the vicinity of easily
ignitible material, such as in clothes closets.
So you may have to prove the use of that area to an inspector.
 
  #11  
Old 06-01-13, 10:24 AM
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Originally Posted by chandler
No electrical panels in bathrooms.






Some "ethics" considerations for the OP... these are a mix of electrical + "common sense".

- There is no reason to partition away a panelboard that is already in a closet.

- I normally frown upon putting PBs in "closet situations" where they invariably become inaccessible behind stacks and piles of clutter... nevermind 240.24(D)

-Your post is indecisive. Are you going to have a closet in the bathroom that has the PB in it? Your drawing says otherwise.

The best solution is to have your bathroom closet with the PB in it, and then also put a door near the PB as "outside access" to it. The reason for that is to avoid the problem of "temporary access denial" because of the fact that it is a bathroom.
 
  #12  
Old 06-01-13, 11:10 AM
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You guys are making this waaaay too complicated.

First of all, you can not have a door into that closet from the bathroom. Aside from looking really dumb when there's already a door from outside, that will definitely classify it as a linen closet, which falls under 240.24 (D).

It isn't that a breaker box can't be installed in 'any' closet, it just can't be installed in a closet in the vicinity of easily combustibles, and there has to be the required clearance around the panel - and most 'closets' do not have that. If the OP were to just wall that area off into a 'storage room' at least 3'1" wide (finished), with a door, and not install any shelving or anything, I believe it would pass.

Now that said, I question the qualifications of both the architect AND the electrician who did that work. Considering that corner was stubbed out to be a bathroom, the panel should NOT have been installed there in the first place. Is that new construction or renovation? Was it done recently?
 

Last edited by JerseyMatt; 06-01-13 at 12:29 PM.
  #13  
Old 06-01-13, 01:07 PM
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That's a purrty picture right there Nick. Hillbiily NEC says you should be able to be showering and just grab right on to an ungrounded panel. Hillbilly code also says you must use tandem breakers even when there are 68 slots free.
 
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