220v subpanel GFCI feed?

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  #1  
Old 06-07-13, 06:03 AM
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220v subpanel GFCI feed?

Which of these diagrams [http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...diagrams.html]] apply to me, and should I start a new post for this question (sorry, I'm new)?

Looking at the subpanel diagram I'm a little confused and am looking for verification.

I'm upgrading a 110v pool pump to a 220v pump and need to install a new 220v circuit. I plan on running a new homerun from my main panel to a subpanel about 60 feet from the main, it will be attached to the same side of my home. My plan was to put a 20amp GFCI subpanel about 6 feet from the pump.

My question: Can I install a two pole 30amp 220v breaker at the main, connect it to a 3-wire (hot + neutral + ground) wire and run it to my subpanel? And then run a four wire from the subpanel to the pump since that's what the GFCI breaker calls for?

The reason I ask is because I already ran the 3-wire homerun based on the advice of a home depot person. But after reading more on the subject I get the feeling I am supposed to run a 4-wire from the main because I need an isolated neutral AND a ground neutral.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 06-07-13 at 06:44 AM.
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  #2  
Old 06-07-13, 06:52 AM
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For a swimming pool you can't use cable because you can't use an uninsulated ground to an outside pool. Best to just run a single four wire feed using conduit to a subpanel then come off that for your other needs.
 
  #3  
Old 06-07-13, 10:13 AM
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.220v subpanel GFCI feed?

Which of these diagrams [Sub Panel Diagrams] apply to me, and should I start a new post for this question (sorry, I'm new)?
Third diagram down, Main panel to sub panel (main lug). Check with your inspector, some wont allow sub panels with less than a 30A feed.
I'm upgrading a 110v pool pump to a 220v pump and need to install a new 220v circuit. I plan on running a new homerun from my main panel to a subpanel about 60 feet from the main, it will be attached to the same side of my home. My plan was to put a 20amp GFCI subpanel about 6 feet from the pump.
My plan would be to put the GFCI breaker in the main panel. And use a $6 AC disconnect six feet from the pump. Three wires, hot, hot, ground not smaller than #12, from the main panel on.

For a circuit that just supplies the pool pump, and no other pool equipment, is part of a cable assembly(not conduit), and only runs inside the building, the ground may be bare. Otherwise the ground must be insulated. Reference: NEC 680.21(A)(4)One-Family Dwellings.
My question: Can I install a two pole 30amp 220v breaker at the main, connect it to a 3-wire (hot + neutral + ground) wire and run it to my subpanel?
Yes, except #10 wire for a 30A feed and 4-wire, hot, hot, neutral, ground.
And then run a four wire from the subpanel to the pump since that's what the GFCI breaker calls for?
The breaker can supply, but does not require, a four wire load. Three wires go to the 240V pump, hot, hot, ground.
The reason I ask is because I already ran the 3-wire homerun based on the advice of a home depot person. But after reading more on the subject I get the feeling I am supposed to run a 4-wire from the main because I need an isolated neutral AND a ground neutral.
Is this run protected from physical damage by being inside the structure (walls) or sleeved in conduit? If any part of the run is outside the walls of the house, is it rated for wet locations (UF, not NM/romex)?

There's a lug on the outside of the pool pump. It's for the #8 bond wire. Don't forget it. And for safety's sake, check the integrity of the entire bond system.
 

Last edited by Glennsparky; 06-07-13 at 10:48 AM.
  #4  
Old 06-07-13, 11:01 AM
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...If any part of the run is outside the walls of the house, is it rated for wet locations (UF, not NM/romex)?...
My bad. The UF would have to have an insulated ground if any part of it were outside the building. UF is not usually run inside buildings because it would have to be double rated, "for indoor use" (fire resistant).
 
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