How do I remove baseboard heaters?

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  #1  
Old 06-08-13, 08:54 AM
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How do I remove baseboard heaters?

I'm converting an electric baseboard-heated house to gas heat. As I remove each baseboard, what should I be doing with the wiring feeding the baseboard? Ideally the wiring should be put in accessible junction box, but that would ruin the look of the room.

In addition, each baseboard has its own thermostat control panel on another wall, near the light switch. I have the same issue there ... what to do with the wiring feeding it after the control panel is removed.

If there's a more suitable place to post this ...

Any replies greatly appreciated.
 
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  #2  
Old 06-08-13, 08:59 AM
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Removing baseboard heaters and their controls?

I'm converting an electric baseboard-heated house to gas heat. As I remove each baseboard, what should I be doing with the wiring feeding the baseboard? Ideally the wiring should be put in accessible junction box, but that would ruin the look of the room.

In addition, each baseboard has its own thermostat control panel on another wall, near the light switch. I have the same issue there ... what to do with the wiring feeding it after the control panel is removed.

Electrical code that applies would be Ontario, Canada, if that matters.

Any replies greatly appreciated.
 
  #3  
Old 06-08-13, 09:19 AM
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You can abandon the wiring. Remove the feeds from their breakers, cut them back so they can't be connected, push them out of the panel and plug the holes with snap in covers.

Do the same where they feed the heaters and stat. You can remove the boxes and repair the holes.

Ideally, you should label the cables with a tag of some sort.

Only active live circuits need to be in accessible junction boxes.
 
  #4  
Old 06-08-13, 09:49 AM
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You can abandon the wiring in place, without a junction box, if you cut it short at each end - short enough that it cannot be reconnected. This specifically includes at the panel. If you do that, the wiring can be pushed back in the wall and the wall repaired.

Electrical code that applies would be Ontario, Canada, if that matters.
It does. My answer is based on the NEC. The CEC is the same in most instances but you should still check locally.

Since you're in Canada, it would help us focus our answers better if you would change the location in your profile to show that. "Canada" is one of the choices there.
 
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Old 06-08-13, 10:14 AM
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I replied to your original thread. I have merged the replies and left the second post since you clarified location.
 
  #6  
Old 06-10-13, 07:04 AM
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I appreciate the replies guys. I updated my profile and will see if the same method meets CEC.
 
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