Electrical Rough In for Range and Range Hood

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  #1  
Old 06-17-13, 06:38 PM
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Electrical Rough In for Range and Range Hood

What is the proper height to put in the outlet for an electric range? I set the top of the 4"x4" metal box at 8" above slab since my last range the plug is way down there. Is this OK or is there a standard mounting height?

Second question regarding the range hood. What is a good mounting height for roughing in the electrical connection for a range hood? Does a range hood need a dedicated circuit all on it's own? How about the lights under the hood does that typically require a different circuit or can it be from the same as the motor? I haven't decided on which hood to use but need to get the wiring done now.

Thanks!
 
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Old 06-17-13, 07:11 PM
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Range outlet height can depend on what brand of range you have, and what style of installation it is. Your range should have installation instructions which should guide you for that. If it's just a regular 30 inch freestanding range, there is no exact measurement it needs. But you want to make sure you don't have the plug and outlet hitting the back of the range and preventing the range from sliding all the way in.. Once again, check your installation instructions.

Same with your range hood. A lot of them get hardwired in. So you can leave a wire hanging out through the drywall until the cabinets are in. And if you're putting new cabinets in, then your designer or cabinet supplier will work with you to tell the proper heights. No you don't need to have it on a dedicated circuit, in my area, we are allowed to put in on an appliance circuit. Generally, it's one set of wires does everything. So you run a 12/2 w ground wire to it, or a 14/2 depending on the size of your wire you are pulling power from. You should have at least a general idea what type of stove and range hood you want to use.
 
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Old 06-17-13, 07:16 PM
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If the hood is cord and plug connected it requires a dedicated circuit. If hardwired it can be on a lighting circuit.

Your cabinets will set the height.
 
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Old 06-18-13, 10:00 AM
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"We are allowed to put it ( range hood ) on an appliance circuit"----

Art 210.52 , (B) Small Appliances , (2) No Other Outlets reads ---" The two or more small-appliance Branch-Circuits [ per 210.52 , (B), (1) ] shall have no other outlets"
 
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Old 06-18-13, 12:47 PM
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Yes, shall have no other outlets -- like the dining room, living room, outdoors, etc etc. My local building inspector figures an exhaust hood is a small appliance, because he allows it. Same with the outlets I install inside a cabinet for an appliance lift. And the hood exhausts I usually install run around $1000. Fancy looking, but they don't use much electricity.

Mod Note: the NEC allows dining room receptacles on the kitchen small appliance branch circuits.
 

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Old 06-18-13, 03:13 PM
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Art 210.52 is titled "Dwelling Unit Receptacle Outlets"--- 210.52 (B) applies only to receptacles for small appliances.
 
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Old 06-18-13, 05:28 PM
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The dining room receptacles can be put on the small appliance circuits?? That's a new one on me. Oh well, it's ok, I wouldn't wire it that way anyway. So much for the words "shall have no other outlets"
 
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Old 06-18-13, 07:55 PM
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This thread sure is getting confusing.

Most of the standard receptacles in the kitchen, dining room, pantry, etc. fall under the "Small Appliances" category of 210.52(B). So all need to be included in the "two or more" 20-amp branch circuits. And at least two of them need to serve the countertops. "no other outlets" means lights, dishwasher, living room, etc.
 
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Old 06-18-13, 08:35 PM
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Good summary Astuff.

................?
 
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Old 06-18-13, 09:02 PM
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the NEC allows dining room receptacles on the kitchen small appliance branch circuits.
From the 2011 NEC:
210.11 Branch Circuits Required. Branch circuits for lighting and for appliances, including motor-operated appliances, shall be provided to supply the loads calculated in accordance with 220.10. In addition, branch circuits shall be provided for specific loads not covered by 220.10 where required elsewhere in this Code and for dwelling unit loads as specified in 210.11(C).

210.11(C) Dwelling Units.
(1) Small-Appliance Branch Circuits.
In addition to the number of branch circuits required by other parts of this section, two or more 20-ampere small-appliance branch circuits shall be provided for all receptacle outlets specified by 210.52(B).

210.52 Dwelling Unit Receptacle Outlets. This section provides requirements for 125-volt, 15- and 20-ampere receptacle outlets.

(B) Small Appliances.

(1) Receptacle Outlets Served.
In the kitchen, pantry, breakfast room, dining room, or similar area of a dwelling unit, the two or more 20-ampere small-appliance branch circuits required by 210.11(C)(1) shall serve all wall and floor receptacle outlets covered by 210.52(A), all countertop outlets covered by 210.52(C), and receptacle outlets for refrigeration equipment.

(2) No Other Outlets. The two or more small-appliance branch circuits specified in 210.52(B)(1) shall have no other outlets.
Two 20A Small Appliance Branch Circuits are required in the dining room. Those two circuits are independent of the two (or more) SABCs requires for countertop receptacles in the kitchen. The SABCs in the kitchen must be GFCI protected. The SABCs in the dining room must be AFCI protected.

Originally Posted by Re-mdlr
So much for the words "shall have no other outlets"
Still a requirement.
 
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