1920s Crouse-Hinds Receptacles, mounting?

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  #1  
Old 06-28-13, 03:26 AM
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1920s Crouse-Hinds Receptacles, mounting?

I debated posting this here for obvious reasons... but, oh well, here it is.

I have a few of these receptacles that I picked up recently and had hopes of using them. They must secure to some kind of plate with the screw clips they have, but I don't see any such plate that will work with them. Is my hunch right, as far as mounting?

 
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Old 06-28-13, 03:33 AM
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NIck, I think the yoke (not shown) attaches via the two screws and clamps above and below the receptacle openings. But, you're right, don't use them. Obvious reasons, you know. But for the lookers,
1) they are not UL approved
2) they are older than dirt
3) they do not have a grounding means
4) their mounting is suspect
5) standard cover plates won't fit over them
 
  #3  
Old 06-28-13, 04:30 AM
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Those sure look like they are brand new (physical condition, not the design).
What type of material is the face made out of (looks almost like plastic in the pic)?
 
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Old 06-28-13, 04:56 AM
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They didn't look brand new when I got ahold of them, quite the opposite. I restore this stuff for a living.

I took it completely apart and polished each bit on a buffer. The two screws on the "dogbone" cover hold in the contact strips. They're made of heavy gauge work-hardened copper and the neutral side (facing) is nickel plated.

These are cast out of a solid piece of "phenolic composition stuff". It's a heavy and hard material that was used in electrical applications throughout the 20s-40s. Each company had their own version of it, usually proprietary. Some of the stuff is tougher than modern plastic and several companies even claimed bulletproof.
 
  #5  
Old 06-28-13, 02:12 PM
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Its a condulet fitting. its meant to fit on a conduit fitting such as you would find used to form a t or a 90 degree bend in conduit runs. There were also later u ground versions made with the outlets facing opposite of one another as seen here.

Edit: It mounts the same way this lampholder does: old condulet lampholder fixture.
 

Last edited by Nashkat1; 06-28-13 at 08:49 PM. Reason: Simplify link
  #6  
Old 06-28-13, 07:40 PM
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See if the holes match up with an LB or something similar...
 
  #7  
Old 06-28-13, 08:59 PM
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Its a condulet fitting.
Good call. Thanks, Noma.

This makes sense, because Nick identified his receptacles as "1920s Crouse-Hinds Receptacles," and Condulet is a registered trademark of Cooper Crouse-Hinds.

Kind of an early Wiremold, with lighting available too.
 
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