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Adding a light and switch, plus new receptacle from a current light switch.

Adding a light and switch, plus new receptacle from a current light switch.

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  #1  
Old 07-04-13, 05:57 PM
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Adding a light and switch, plus new receptacle from a current light switch.

After a lot of reading on this forum, I attempted my project; but not having any success.
Here is my issue:
Currently have a light switch for two lights in a large room. I have turned the large room into two smaller rooms, and need to have the two lights with separate switches. The switch has two double wire cables, where one is the power source and the other goes to the light on the left. The light on the left also has a double wire cable going to the light on the right. Therefore, both lights are turned on/off with the light switch.

Now, I have added a light switch to the room on the right, for that light. I pulled the wire cable from the light on the left (which goes to the light on the right) and fed it to my new light switch. Then I fed another wire from the new light switch to the old light switch (where the power supply is).

On the old light switch box, I joined new wires to the matching colours (all 3 white together, black to the nut with the pigtail which is attached to the bottom screw of light switch, all ground together). Black from left light is attached to the top screw on the light switch.

On the new switch box, I joined all the white together (from light, from old light switch box, from double wire cable to new receptacle). I then joined the two black (from old light switch and new receptacle) and added a pigtail from there to bottom screw of new light switch. I attached black from right light to top screw on new light switch.

Please let me know where I went wrong on wiring above.
Any input is appreciated. Thanks
 

Last edited by ray2047; 07-04-13 at 06:09 PM. Reason: Fixed paragraphs to make it easier to read.
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  #2  
Old 07-04-13, 06:58 PM
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On the old light switch box there were only two 2-conductor cables...one for power in, and the other to the light on the left. The light on the left had two 2- conductor cables...one from the switch, and the other to the light on the right (which I removed and then connected to the new switch). Now, the old switch box has three 2-conductor cables because I added the feed to the new switch box.

Yes, I ran a 2-conductor cable from the old switch box to the new one, as stated above.



I am confused with your last comment. I apologize for my ignorance. The 2-conductor cable between both switch boxes has Black to power in on old switch box, and on the new switch box it is connected to the receptacle black as well as the pigtail black (which goes to bottom screw of switch...because top screw of switch takes black from light fixture). Is this what I did wrong?
 
  #3  
Old 07-04-13, 07:07 PM
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After reading your post and trying to draw out my original post I have deleted my previous answer.

Yes, I ran a 2-conductor cable from the old switch box to the new one, as stated above.
I thought you had two 2-conductor cables. between the boxes. I deleted my previous answer. You really need one 3-conductor cable not a 2 conductor cable. White for the receptacle neutral. Black serving as power to the receptacle and switch. Red caring power back to the original cable to the light.
 
  #4  
Old 07-04-13, 07:14 PM
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Thank you. I will try to draw a diagram of what you just suggested, to make sure that I have it right.
 
  #5  
Old 07-04-13, 08:05 PM
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I'm not sure where to put the red wire from the 3-conductor cable on the old switch box. Here is a diagram of what I did using a 2-conductor cable between both switches. I hope you can understand the diagram.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]14711[/ATTACH]
 
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  #6  
Old 07-04-13, 08:43 PM
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You would have to move the light cable to the new box and disconnect it at the original box or run a second 2-conductor cable between the boxes to do that.
Here is what I was suggesting, leaving the cable to the light in the original box.

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Last edited by ray2047; 07-04-13 at 08:59 PM.
  #7  
Old 07-04-13, 09:05 PM
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Thank you for that diagram...it helps me understand how to use the red wire. As you stated, my diagram should also work, given that the second light is not going into the old switch box. However, I have no power to the new switch or the new receptacle. And, when I turn the old switch on (where the power supply sits), the breaker trips.

If I don't connect the new 2-conductor for the new light switch box and receptacle, the old switch box and light work fine.

...I'm at a loss, and don't know what else to do.
 
  #8  
Old 07-04-13, 10:05 PM
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I am confused. Are you now saying you have two 2-conductor cables at the switch box. If so then your diagram will work. Recheck all your connections. Disconnect the cable you think is hot at the old box and verify with a multimeter.
 
  #9  
Old 07-06-13, 06:14 AM
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I don't have a multimeter, but I'm buying one today.

I went back to my project and disconnected the new receptacle, leaving only the new switch and light connected to the old switch box. Now, if the old switch is on, the new switch and light work, but if it is off, it doesn't. Also, if the old switch is on, I can turn on/off the second light with the new switch.

It seems like the power from the old switch to the new switch is controlled by the old one.
 
  #10  
Old 07-06-13, 06:20 AM
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Be sure to buy an analog multimeter not a digital multimeter*. An $8-$15 dollar analog multimeter will be fine. Just get a multimeter only not one of those kits that contain a lot of near useless junk and cost more. You might also look for a set of alligator clips to slip on the probes. It can sometimes make it easier and safer to use.

*Cheap digital meter often aren't able to reject spurious readings due to their high impedance.
 
  #11  
Old 07-06-13, 06:27 AM
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Thanks for the advice.

I also forgot to mention that I tried switching around the black and white from the power in cable, but it didn't make any difference.

I'm really confused as to why this isn't working.
 
  #12  
Old 07-06-13, 06:36 AM
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I tried switching around the black and white from the power in cable, but it didn't make any difference
It wouldn't except safety wise. Electrical equipment can't see color and that is the only difference between the wires except for safety issues that don't affect function.
 
  #13  
Old 07-06-13, 08:50 AM
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Once again, I apologize for my ignorance in this matter.

I have bought the analog multimeter...but have no idea how to use it. Could you provide me with some guidance please.

Thanks
 
  #14  
Old 07-06-13, 09:34 AM
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Disconnect the cable you think is power in and check for voltage. Touch one probe to the black wire and one to the white wire. Set the meter to AC voltage in the 250 volt range or equivalent on your meter. You want your meter set so the voltage you are reading is about mid scale.

Post a picture of the front of the meter or a make and model number if you need more detailed instructions on using it.
 
  #15  
Old 07-06-13, 10:31 AM
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[ATTACH=CONFIG]14744[/ATTACH]

Here is my analog multimeter.
 
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  #16  
Old 07-06-13, 11:02 AM
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The instructions would be as I posted. Plug one probe into each jack at the bottom. (For AC they are interchangeable.) Set the pointer to the 250 volt mark on the yellow AC voltage selector. Look on the meter for the scale whose highest reading is 250. That will be the scale you look at. Try it in a couple of receptacles so you will know what to expect.
 
  #17  
Old 07-06-13, 07:21 PM
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Thank you. I ran out of time today to do this, but will definitely test it tomorrow.

I assume the test is done with the power on, in order to get a reading.
 
  #18  
Old 07-06-13, 08:10 PM
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Yes with power on and cable disconnected.
 
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