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electrical noob question: how to plug in 240V pressure cooker with 6-15P

electrical noob question: how to plug in 240V pressure cooker with 6-15P

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  #1  
Old 07-15-13, 09:37 AM
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electrical noob question: how to plug in 240V pressure cooker with 6-15P

First off many many thanks if someone can help with what I'm sure is a very simple question for someone with the knowledge and experience. Rather than do something that will ruin a brand new appliance or worse start a fire, I'm going to defer to someone with expertise.

I'm in Colorado, USA, in a suburb of Denver. I just bought a pressure cooker that has the following electrical requirements: "240 V designed to operate at a frequency of 50/60 Hz with a line voltage of 230 volts AC +/- 5%. 1050 watts, 4.38amps" It has a 6-15P plug. I got this new for a steal but am now stuck figuring out how and where to plug this in. I bought a step up voltage transformer:
Amazon.com : Goldsource STU-2000 Step Up/Down Voltage Transformer Converter - AC 110/220 V - 2000 Watt : Electronics
...but this solution does not seem to be working, the pressure cooker isn't turning on.

Should I get a different step up converter? I noticed this converter, though new, was slightly damaged during shipping. Although all the lights are on, I have no idea how much voltage it is actually producing.
I have two unused outlets where a stove and a dryer were plugged in. The stove has a 14-50R outlet, the dryer has a 14-30R outlet. Can I somehow use these outlets, with some sort of adapter? Thanks again for any help you can give me as I am totally stuck trying to figure this out myself.
 
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  #2  
Old 07-15-13, 10:39 AM
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If you already have 240 power at the existing unused outlets, it should be a $20-30 fix for a new outlet ($10) and a new breaker ($10 - $20 for a 15 amp, needs to match the make of your panel). Really should be an easy swap.

But, if you needed this running ASAP, I'd try a simple adapter. That's assuming the 240v cooker is some commercial model with overheat protection etc.

edit- my mistake 2x 20 amp from 14-30, not a 6-15.
 

Last edited by Hal_S; 07-15-13 at 10:57 AM.
  #3  
Old 07-15-13, 10:41 AM
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Change the breaker for the dryer receptacle to 15 amps and change the receptacle to a 6-15R. At the new receptacle you will cap the neutral and only connect the two hots and the ground.
 
  #4  
Old 07-15-13, 10:52 AM
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Originally Posted by ray2047
Change the breaker for the dryer receptacle to 15 amps and change the receptacle to a 6-15R.
Curious now, {may be updating 2nd kitchen with a gas stove, leaving an extra 240v outlet)

Say the OP had picked up two 15A 240v appliances, pressure cooker and deep fryer....

Could he mount two of these

to replace the 14-30?

Or perhaps mount three to replace the 50 amp plug?
 
  #5  
Old 07-15-13, 11:02 AM
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I do not see how the Y cord would work in any way. It only takes a 30 amp 120/240 twist lock receptacle, like you would find on a generator, and converts it to two 20 amp 120 receptacles.

The OP only needs one 240 volt 15 amp receptacle.

@OP - I suggest sending the transformer back as it is not needed, and follow Ray's and Hal's advice using the existing unused circuits.
 
  #6  
Old 07-15-13, 11:11 AM
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Excellent, thanks for the advice. And if I did want to use a 120V outlet, would I use a step up transformer? And why does the 20 amp circuit need to be changed down to a 15amp out of curiosity?
 
  #7  
Old 07-15-13, 11:20 AM
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120 volts is what you have at your standard outlets. No transformer needed.

Your existing dryer and range feed are 30 and 50 amps respectively. You need to drop down the breaker because that is too high for the device. The receptacle would melt before the breaker would ever trip.

You could use a 20 amp breaker and device if you wanted. 20 amp devices will accept 15 amp configured plugs. The plug on your pressure cooker is a 15 amp which is why it was suggested to use a 15 amp breaker.
 
  #8  
Old 07-15-13, 12:00 PM
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The receptacle Tolyn refers to is a 6-20R. It would be a good choice if you can't find a 6-15R that accepts #10 wire. A 6-20R will definitely accept #10. I'm not sure about 6-15R. As Tolyn said my choice of breaker in my original post was to match the receptacle. With a 6-20R either a 15a or 20a breaker would be okay.
 
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