Timer on Water Pump??

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  #1  
Old 07-15-13, 11:58 AM
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Timer on Water Pump??

This may not be the correct forums category, but I could not find another that fit. What is the process to put a timer on a standard water pump? Pumping water from the creek to my garden. Thanks.
 
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Old 07-15-13, 01:35 PM
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Define standard water pump. If you are speaking of a 1/4 - 1/3 horse electric motor @ 120 VAC, then I would feed a timer with the appropriate amp rating from a GFCI outlet and plug the pump motor into the controlled timer outlet.
 
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Old 07-15-13, 01:48 PM
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Goldstar........yes that is the type of pump I am referring to. Do they make these outlet timers detailed enough to let's say run the pump 2 minutes every 15 minutes? Sorry but I am not at all familiar with these and I couldn't find that info online, maybe because it doesn't work like that.
 
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Old 07-15-13, 02:39 PM
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I am moving to Electrical. That is really what this question boils down to.
 
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Old 07-15-13, 06:55 PM
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You need an interval timer. Fairly common in industrial equipment but not so much in consumer equipment. You may also need a 24 hour time clock to control exactly when these timed intervals need occur..

Post back if you need specifics.
 
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Old 07-15-13, 07:00 PM
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No....the generic plug in type don't have short times like that. There are timers available to do what you want but they are just raw timers......no power cord, receptacles, case, etc.

Basically a put-it-together-yourself project.

Interested in a building project ?
 
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Old 07-16-13, 06:45 AM
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A project is not what I really wanted to get into here. Especially when I know nothing about what you guys speak of and I'm on a budget, so I can't pay a couple hundred buck for an electrician to do it.

I did see that Home Depot has an outlet timer for $20 that you can set 20 cycles in a 24 hour period............ Woods Digital Indoor Heavy Duty 7-Day Timer 2 Outlets 3 Conductor - White-50009 at The Home Depot ............. 20 cycles during daylight hours would work just fine. I'm just not sure how detailed I can get with the length of time the plug can have current. Is it standard length of time or can I set it to a few minutes if I want? Do you guys know?
 
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Old 07-16-13, 08:02 AM
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You may be able to get your questions answered "from the horses mouth" from Woods at the following:

TOLL FREE HOTLINE, 1-800-561-4321. If you have immediate questions about application, installation, troubleshooting, or a damaged component, please call CCI Consumer product hotline at 1-800-561-4321 or email questions to: [email protected]

They also make exterior timers which may be better suited to your application.
 
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Old 07-16-13, 05:36 PM
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There are LOTS of digital time clocks available that have intervals as small as one minute. Some have up to 20 on/off operations per day or week. Some have rechargeable battery back-up and some use replaceable batteries for back-up. Many are available for less than $20 and if you don't mind buying from China via Ebay you can often find them for less than $10. You might need to add a power cord and receptacle to the least expensive units.
 
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Old 07-18-13, 06:03 PM
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Why are you cycling so much, so the garden isn't flooded with water? If so, what if you did longer cycles but filled a large tank. From the large tank you could use drip tubes to do a slow constant stream of water.
 
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